Carl Jung's Personality And Psychological Theories

Good Essays
Jung tackled personality and psychological types from a clinical perspective. He believed that finding the true self was finding wholeness and not perfection. This assignment will elaborate on Jung's Analysis and the importance of his theories. Carl Gustav Jung
Carl Jung is one of the most influential psychiatrists of all time. He argued that the truth was not always scientific or psychological but that the soul plays a key role in the psyche.
Carl Jung was born in Kesswil, Switerland on the 26 July 1875 and died in 1961. When Jung was four, he moved to Basel with his family. Growing up, Jung enjoyed being alone with his thoughts. Jung received a medical degree from the University of Zurich. Jung then studied psychology in France. (Carl
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(www.jungnewyork.com)
Jungian therapy may include creative activities of self-expression which help clients engage with their imagination and relieve inner creative qualities that may be inhibited by moral or ethical values. (http://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/)

Merits of the theory
Jung’s ideas about psychological types helped create the Myers-Briggs personality test. He popularised the terms introvert and extravert (Cherry, 2016.). His research led to the invention of the lie detector. He expanded the basis of psychoanalysis and opened it up to a broader range of concerns, including the spiritual and mythical. He was an innovator of transpersonal psychology and he was well skilled in helping people understand the emotional power of dreams and imagination. (Cherry, 2016.).

Critiques against the theory
Jung believed that once the evil side (the shadow) has been recognized, impulse control would become easier. Critics feel that Jung never gave an explanation of evil and thus would not work in the evils of mythological. (S Zappia,
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Many critics feel he was evasive with some of his predictions so that he could not be proved wrong. (S Zappia, n.d.)
Jung’s theory was shaped by his and his patient’s dreams, thoughts and self-reflections. Critics feel these are not adequate scientific observation for the basis of a major theory on human personality. (S Zappia, n.d.)

Relevance/significance today
Carl Jung's work has made a notable impact on psychology. His introversion and extraversion concepts have contributed to personality psychology and also influenced psychotherapy. His influenced many assessment tools which are currently used in psychotherapy. Alcoholics Anonymous, which has helped millions of people suffering from alcohol dependence, was founded by one of Jung’s Patients.(Cherry, 2016)

Conclusion
Jung's theories highlight the psychological approach to growth and wholeness as a complete being. Jung's attempted to guide his client to reconciliation of any personality unbalances which may be present in many psychological disturbances and physical illness and obsessions. Jung’s theories are helpful in understanding the middle ground of psychological life between instinct and spirit. At times his writing is clear and precise; at times he gets carried away with his

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