Carl Jung's Complex Analysis

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Carl Jung, the pioneer of analytical psychology, explains complex, a core pattern of emotions, and perceptions in the personal unconscious organized around a common theme (Shultz and Shultz, 2009). Unlike what Carl Jung believed, collective unconscious might also create complexes, such as phobia, the irrational fear, through inheriting instinct. Anyhow, once the complex is fixed, a person starts to have a certain paradigm about the certain theme. Therefore, complexes could be interpreted as a psychological understanding of a person’s destiny. Every people, both consciously and unconsciously, have positive and negative types of complexes. However, it is the burden of the individuals how to manage to live with it. Psychology, as the study of …show more content…
According to Jung, individual’s complexes exist constructing the individual unconsciousness. Jung himself explained individual unconsciousness as “Everything of which I know, but of which I am not at the moment thinking; everything of which I was once conscious but have now forgotten; … ; all the future things which are taking shape in me and will sometime come to consciousness” (Jung, 1973). To state briefly, individual unconsciousness is the storage within the mind that accumulates memories that are unnoticed today. Forgotten experiences, especially ones form childhood, are not lost. Instead they form a base of human personality. Among the forgotten experiences, consternation becomes a complex which can cause pain and suffering (Matton, 1999). That is why the negative complexes are likely to be settled as the shadow, the unpleasant dark side, in people’s mind. That is why many, both consciously and unconsciously, try to hide their complexes by showing behaviors like rejecting, avoiding, pretending, attacking, and more. For both major and minor emotional disorder, facing their problems through introspection is necessary. Knowing a psychological phenomenon can relieve people as the academic study shows that there are similar cases with they-selves’. For example, when trypophobia became a widely used word, people have become possible to explain their irrational fear about the collected holes. After …show more content…
For instance, some people use their psychological condition for personal benefit. The well-known example is people giving testimony about their psychological illness to evoke pity from the public. Another example is the patients who have psychological reversal during psychotherapy. Psychological reversal, which is a subconscious condition of self-sabotage (Heitler, 2011), is frequently shown when the patients judge that they gain additional profit, such as less stress from family members, during therapy and unconsciously refuse to improve his mental situation. Moreover, some people use the psychological theories to hide their shadow. It is quite obvious that psychology became publically popular. Even though Korea is still the society with misconception toward psychological treatment, the study itself is approached to be interesting among the public. For its example, there are various media contents dealing psychology of human such as cartoon, drama, book, etc. Due to such phenomenon, people learning psychology as a hobby, through reading books, are quite easy to see. As stated in the previous paragraph, people tend to hide their negative complexes as their shadow through various types of behaviors. Psychological knowledge usually becomes convenient means in the method of hiding. For instance, there are quite many who arbitrarily analyses the mental state of their acquaintances. Through evaluating others by

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