Care Strategy And Primary Health Care System In New Zealand

2111 Words 9 Pages
The terms’ ”chronic illness”, “chronic disease”, “long-term illness” and “long-term condition” (LTC) are all used interchangeably worldwide and in relation to this essay, the term LTC will be used. This essay discusses the economic, political and social impact of LTC’S, explores the modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors which contribute to LTC’s and also discusses the prevalence of some LTC’s in New Zealand which is supported by epidemiological data. This essay also examines the Primary Health Care Strategy and primary health care system in New Zealand, and discusses the main goals and vision for primary health care, as well as the role of primary health care organisations and LTC’s. This essay lastly focuses on the role of primary …show more content…
The PHCS has also allowed PHC nurses more opportunities to enhance their practice by improving coordination of care across services, reinforcing and building stronger links across sectors and within multidisciplinary teams (MoH, 2003). According to Bell (2013), in regards to LTC’s, in order to reduce modifiable risk factors, increase management and to keep those with LTC’S out of hospital and in the community, an adequate, well-trained PHC workforce is essential, and that the contribution that nurses make is critical. Bell (2013) further states that in order to meet emerging health care challenges, PHC nurses are needed to be recruited, trained and professionally developed to be a fully utilised workforce. An important goal outlined in the PHC nursing framework is targeted at education and career development for PHC nurses (MoH, 2003). By centering nursing programmes round the principles of PHC nursing, it ensures that future nurses are more able to understand enough about PHC to incorporate these moralities into their practice, which enables them to focus more on prevention and management with a well aligned social model of health and an emphasis on …show more content…
(2013) states that a nurse teaching cares of a patient with an LTC such as diabetes should emphasise the role that education has in successful management but should also stress the importance of promoting participation in order to succeed with a positive outcome in the management of LTC’s. However, PHC and community nurses have reported difficulties in accessing further education and have identified time, lack of finances or relief staff to cover workloads and geographical location as barriers in broadening and advancing their edification (Hughes & Calder, 2006). Further education and training of PHC nursing provides a platform for PHC teams and Māori and Pacific nurses to develop capacity and become better placed to work alongside communities as services should be patient, whanau and community centred (MoH, 2003). Robertson et al. (2015) consider nursing to be the very essence of PHC and hold the view that PHC nursing necessitates aligning nursing practice with community and population needs to develop funding streams for service delivery which supports an integrated approach to practice. Robertson et al. (2015) further states that PHC nurses do improve health outcomes and that PHC nurses have the potential to reduce inequalities in health between social groups. Furthermore, part of the PHC nursing scope of practice is to ensure the protection and support of their professional partnership with their clients and community (MoH,

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