Canadian Government Vs Federal Government

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While the United States and Canada are bordering countries that share a continent their governments are quite different. The United States government runs on a presidential institutional system with a single member district. The United States has a federal government which allows power to be divided by the national government and local governments. However, Canada is fairly different. Canada operates on a parliamentary institutional system with a single member district. Canada also has a federal government, they divide power between the federal government, provincial governments, and local governments. The institutional differences between the United States and Canadian government lead to a difference in public policies. An important policy …show more content…
The system of checks and balances keeps the branches of government in order and stops one branch from becoming more powerful than the others. We also have the two party system, between Democrats and Republicans, which is a constant power struggle and vie for dominance. The two party system in conjunction with judicial review hinders the efficiency of passing legislation.
In Canada, the branches of government have different tasks that they are in charge of. The federal, provincial, and local governments all have different areas of focus that they are in charge of reforming. Canada’s federal government sets guidelines that the provincial and local governments have to follow through with. The federal government’s goal is to make things equal among the provinces and to make the standard of living the same in all provinces. There is no separation of power so the government can pass laws more
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“The Commonwealth Fund found that the United States ranks poorly in terms of health care cost, access, and affordability” (Furlong and Kraft 260). The Affordable Care Act set out to make health care affordable and accessible for all citizens. The health care system is a mixture between public and private care options. The split between public and private health care creates inequality in the health care system. This creates a problem where people that can afford better or more expensive health insurance are provided a better quality of care than those who cannot afford health insurance. Many people believe that the United States should have the best health care system in the world because of the amount of money invested by the government yet the quality of care is still

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