Campaign For Real Beauty

960 Words 4 Pages
Beauty comes in all shapes and sizes, right? Dove’s “Campaign for Real Beauty” has spoken out about the different forms of beauty. Whether they be skinny, curvy, tall, short, young, or old, Dove has made it a point to use their campaign in order to empower every person possible. Virginia Postrel, author of “The Truth about Beauty,” disagrees completely with Dove and their campaign. In her article, Postrel criticizes the beauty that Dove praises (Postrel). Virginia Postrel’s scathing viewpoints are not able to Dove’s inaugural advertisement for the campaign for real beauty appealed to a wider demographic than most advertisement by using realer models. The advertisement is a picture of six women, of all races, who are not at all conventional …show more content…
Dove does an exceptional job of ridding of the normal, skinny models and using more average women in order to depict raw beauty. Postrel, however, is completely against the campaign and criticizes, “We know beauty when we see it…not every girl is beautiful just the way she is” (Postrel 126). Although Postrel’s claim that societal standards may not particularly highlight ever person as beautify, the harsh words that “not every girl is beautiful” is utterly incorrect. While society certainly chooses the definition of beauty, every person possesses their own unique sense of beauty, whether it be pretty eyes or beautiful hair, beauty is beauty. Dove extended its Real Beauty campaign’s boundaries by successfully empowering older women who are not really seen in many advertisements today. In various still ads, Dove uses nude older women from the side view in order to display beauty in any age …show more content…
In the advertisement, a forensic cartoonist has not seen any of the women being interviewed. When the come in, they sit on one side of a curtain and they explain themselves to him, most of the descriptions being extremely critical. Then, another person came in and described the person, exposing the beautiful things that the critical self-descriptions lacked. After the entire process, the two portraits were compared: the first was usually an inaccurate, cruder version of themselves, and the peer described portrait showed the charm, appeal, and altogether elegance of the person (Dove US). The video was provoking and appealed to the emotions of the audiences. These people were, yet again, not as pretty or commercial as many models, but they still exhibited a form of beauty. PR Newswire offers: “It inspires the women, and viewers alike, to reassess how they see themselves. Dove believes that when women look and feel their best, they feel happier” (“Dove Real Beauty Sketches”). The video certainly makes people think about how they view themselves and encourages audiences to find their inner and outer beauty. Postrel, yet again, denounces Dove’s attempts at making women feel beautiful: “Real confidence requires self-knowledge, which includes recognizing one’s shortcomings as well as one’s strengths” (Postrel 127). Postrel, simply put, is judgmental. Dove has tried to make women

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