Mr. Balestrero Analysis

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When Mr. Balestrero is first introduced to the three detectives, Hitchcock uses camera lighting along with camera movement to enunciate the setting which is described as murky and dark. Brean describes this encounter as the following, “Three men came up to him out of the murky shadows of a winter evening. They said they were police officers and showed him badges clipped to wallets. Mr. Balestrero experiencing a little quiver of uneasiness, asked what they wanted.” Hitchcock cannot transfer these elements directly into his film because they are not talking about what is happening but as stated, how it is happening through details. For instance, The description of murky shadows is projects the idea of danger and mystery. Hitchcock presents this …show more content…
Balestrero is in jail, Hitchcock uses camera movement and light to show how helpless and scared Mr. Balestrero is. “Balestrero is a timid man, by his own admission afraid of his own shadow. He has never been in a fight in his life, never carried a weapon, never been arrested, never even received a traffic ticket. As the net of evidence tightened, his mind spun and he did not know what to do or say.” Hitchcock separates this enunciation into two separate parts, one with the focus of the camera when he is first entering the jail, and two when he is in the cell and the camera movement speeds up. “This cell had a heavy steel door with only a little window, and once it had crunched shut on him Balestrero felt caged-in and hopeless.” When Balestrero had the bars closed on him the camera changed to show the steal seat which was being overpowered by a large shadow with a small light beaming through it, showing just how enclosed he was. When he sits down, Hitchcock moves the camera from the ceiling to the ground showing the window which is also covered by bars leading Mr. Balestrero’s face which is being over casted by shadows. The clearest example of camera movement to enunciate Balestrero losing his mind is when he is being held in jail. Hitchcock frantically circles the frame around Balestrero. As seen, Hitchcock causes enunciation to occur through embedding specific movements towards the

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