Camelot: The Construction Of Hadrian's Wall

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During the Roman ruling over England, they would build construct roads and other sorts of architectures. One of these architects would be that of Hadrian’s Wall a Roman frontier built by the order of Emperor Hadrian. The stone wall was built at a height of 6 meters, a width of 3 meters, and at the distance of 73 miles, expanding from Wallsend to Tyne. This wall was served as an active military zone, custom barrier, and a line of defense. But, why would such a wall need to be constructed? Well, for one, it was not made to create a separation between England and Scotland, as they did not exist at the time. Instead, the great wall was constructed both provide protection from the people of Brythons out in the north and mark the limits of the land …show more content…
Camelot is a location in which indeed has some sort of link between the two. After all, the name Camelot was given to the castle where he held court and held the famous Round Table. However, this location was more than a place for the tales of King Arthur. In fact, it would be a key location for many different stories about romance. Also, there seems to be an uproar about its location, whether it is “real”, or fake, as its location is not always certain, shifting from one location to another, all around Great Britain, including at Hadrian’s Wall. Nevertheless, whether Camelot is a real or fictional location, it is a location in which is recorded in all sort of Old English, and will always be a classic location to go …show more content…
In fact, because of them, we are able to have to English language we know it today. These were called runes, in which were used as an alphabet for their writing. It has contained something known as the futhorc, the development of the 24 runic alphabets. Anglo-Saxon runes are an extended version of Elder Futhark, consisting between 26 and 33 letters. However, it is actually believed that it was first used in Frisia before the Anglo-Saxon settled in Britain, calling it the Anglo-Frisia runes. One theory is that this script was developed in Frisia and then adopted in England. Another is that it was brought to England by the Vikings and then modified and later ended up in Frisia. Either way, it would soon stop being practiced by the year 1000 since its banishment by King Cnut, and due to the Norman’s conquest, it just ceased to exist. And yet, it was able to survive all to way for us to see the earliest signs of the English language being

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