Calorimetry Lab Report

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Chemical reactions can be categorized based on the release or absorption of energy. For instance, chemical reactions that release energy are known as exothermic reactions and have a positive change in enthalpy. Moreover, chemical reactions that absorb energy are endothermic, which have a negative change in enthalpy. Since the energy released is usually heat, keeping track of the heat flow in reactions will help determine the change in enthalpy of a reaction. Observing the measurement of heat changes is known as calorimetry; hence, in this lab a calorimeter was used to measure the changes in enthalpy. A calorimeter is well-designed when it is well insulated from the environment so there could be minimal to no heat change between the system and …show more content…
In part 1, the strong base, NaOH, reacts with the strong acid, HCl, to produce a salt (NaCl) and water (H2O). As the molarity of both the bases and the acid was 2.0 M and equal volumes (10.0 mL) were used for each, mixing them caused a neutralization reaction where the sultion was neither acidic or basic. However, the most interesting trend was the fact that when sodium displaced hydrogen, there was a release of energy (heat) from breaking their respective bonds, and was absorbed by the water. In a similar manner, the products of reactinf KOH and were a salt (KCl) and water (H2O), in which energy (heat) is released when potassium displaces hydrogen and is then absorbed by the water. This can also be seen the changes in enthalpy of the acid-base reactions: NaOH and HCl had an enthalpy change of H = 347466.132 J/mol, while KOH and HCl had an enthalpy change of H = 3475317.694 J/mol. Therefore, the increase in temperature for acid-base reactions comes from water absorbing the heat that is released by the neutralization of the acid and base, and are ultimately exothermic …show more content…
Since the MeasureNet device was used, there could have been some errors in properly using it to record data correctly. Also, there might have been errors in being precise when measuring 10.0 mL of each aqueous solution and simply assuming we did can affect the accuracy of the results. A possible soution for this error could be to use more precise measuring tools, such as a burette or pippette, to measure the volumes of the liquids. Another error could have come from not being cautious when using the graduated cylinder. For example, not properly rinsing it with deionized water or keeping track of the which cylinder was used for what aqueous solution could have impacted the precision and accuracy of the results. Additionally, as the calculations required multiple steps, there could have been issues with rounding inbetween each step, which causes inaccurate results. Likewise, simply not understanding how to use the equations could have created errors in the

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