Caged Birds In The Mockingbird Analysis

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Kate Chopin 's novel, The Awakening, is seen as an enlightening novel based on young women from the 1800s. The ultimate goal for women during that time period was for them to live their life for themselves, which required them to break out of the various barriers that was expected from society and their own family. Chopin uses caged birds as a recurring theme to display the domestic lives of women, especially in the character, Edna Pontellier. Caged birds were frequently referenced as a concise representation of women during the Victorian Era. The stereotype of women that was expected from society was that women had no other role besides the role of being a wife and mother. The main assumption of women living their lives in “cages”, and taking …show more content…
At the beginning of the novel, as the parrot begins to shriek no one seems to understand what the parrot is trying to say. “The parrot could speak a little Spanish, and also a language which nobody understood, unless it was the mocking-bird that hung on the other side of the door, whistling his fluty notes out upon the breeze with maddening persistence” ( Chopin 11).The mockingbird symbolizes Mademoiselle Reisz because she is the only character in the novel that truly understands Edna, and what she is going through. Mademoiselle Reisz tells Edna, "The bird that would soar above the level plain of tradition and prejudice must have strong wings" (Chopin 79). This quote shows how Mademoiselle Reisz wants Edna to have the courage to defy society. She understands what Edna is going through because she went through the exact same thing. Mademoiselle Reisz wants passion in life was art, and she faced societal limitations, as a single woman with little money to achieve that goal of being an artist. She does not want Edna to go through the same pain she did, so Mademoiselle Reisz does everything she can to guide Edna to the right …show more content…
She never made a name for herself like Adele or Mademoiselle Reisz did. She went along with the crowd but later, begins to find her true identity. Once she found her true self, Edna started to behave differently. Instead of doing what other women did, Edna gave herself the option to do what she wanted to do. In chapter twenty seven, Edna finally made the difficult decision to abandon her husband 's home and move into the “pigeon house.” The pigeon house is defined as a small bird house for domesticated pigeons, and the pigeon house is where the pigeons go to be free. Edna 's new home makes readers question whether the idea of the pigeon house has gained Edna some independence by moving out of her home, or if she has only found herself in a newer, smaller cage. Women moving out of their family home to pursue their own life was seen as rare during that time period. This shows that Edna went against the stereotypes set against women, and that is an important piece. She wants a place where she could call her own, a home where she makes the decision and has the right to do what she pleases, and that specific scenario shows her being free. Chopin, however, reverses the idea of the parrot. Parrots are known to imitate what they see and hear. This represents Edna following the women in her social circle. Now that Edna is making her own decisions, the parrots are now singing their own song. Which represents

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