CSI Effect

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The "CSI Effect" and Its Potential Impact on Juror Decisions the “CSI Effect” first described in the media as a phenomenon resulting from viewing forensic and crime based television shows. Jurors can be influenced by this effect which can or may cause them to have unrealistic expectations of forensic science during a criminal trial. It will affect jurors’ decisions during a conviction or acquittal process. Research has shown the “CSI Effect” has a pro-defense bias, in that jurors are less likely to convict without the presence of some sort of forensic evidence. Studies have shown actors in the criminal justice system changing their tactics, as if this effect has a significant influence. Unnecessary crime lab tests and expert testimonies have …show more content…
This could be a very big problem which could create a bias and the juror to not have rational thinking when trying to reach a verdict. A person could easily be acquitted without the presence of forensic evidence or even convicted based on a misinterpretation of forensic evidence. It is very scary that even studies have shown attorneys and other actors in the criminal justice system are operating as if this phenomenon is a reality, causing unnecessary work and tests to be completed to rule out any suspected bias (Wise, 2010). A person should receive their verdict based off of the evidence that is presenting itself, not based off unrealistic expectations set forth by the jurors who are wrapped up in forensic reality …show more content…
It raises the bar high. When you watch the show CSI it makes you think and wonder, wow, if they can solve a crime and make it seem so simple, then why do it seems so hard for a lot of crimes to be solved in the real world today? People will develop high expectations and expect more from forensic technology. It also can place the ones committing crimes at a vulnerable state and make them more willing to commit a crime thinking they can get away with it. Just like the show Snap, I personally think that it can set up a person’s motive of wanting to commit a crime by showing them how they solve the crime may make the criminal think of tactics to get away with committing a crime. The equipment that is being used on these types of shows can influence someone that the techniques and equipment used is always

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