CFD Analysis: Shock Forced Analysis And Relation Of Shock Waves

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Register to read the introduction… The shock tube in its simplest form a uniform cross-section tube divided into a driver and driven sections by a diaphragm. Both sections are filled with gases with the driver section at higher pressure. When the diaphragm is suddenly allowed to burst, a plane normal shock travels down the driven section heating the gas there instantaneously. This is replaced by using a pneumatically actuated sliding piston that produces the effect of the diaphragm of the conventional shock tubes. This diaphragm less method has the advantage that it does not pollute the low pressure region by minute fragments produced by the rupture of the diaphragm. A largeamplitude wave formed by the sudden compression of the medium through which the wave moves. Shock waves can be caused by explosions or by objects moving through a fluid at a speed greater than the speed of sound. 2.2 Shock Tube The shock tubes are one of the most common and easiest way to produce shock waves in laboratories. They are used to replicate and direct blast waves at a sensor or a model in order to simulate actual explosions and their effects, usually on a smaller scale. Shock tubes (and related impulse facilities such as shock tunnels, expansion tubes, and expansion tunnels) can also be used to study aerodynamic flow under a wide range of temperatures and pressures that are difficult to obtain in other types of testing …show more content…
Dynamic model cannot be analysed using CFD software so piston at five different position is analysed/This pressure exerted on the flange is determined by modeling the driver gas flow at various positions of the piston. Thus after finding the force acting the acceleration can be determined even more accurately than previous analysis. Thus acceleration, an(t) = Fn(t)/mp where mp is the mass of the piston. This is of significance as it is required for the design of the dampers. The model should not have any leakage so we close all the open ends as shown …show more content…
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