Buried Above The Ground Analysis

1584 Words 7 Pages
In “Buried Above The Ground,” three individuals from different backgrounds, ethnicities, and geographical locations develop Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). A common misconception about PTSD is that it afflicts only war veterans; however, in this documentary the exact opposite is analyzed through the lens of not only a war veteran, but also a survivor of domestic violence and another individual who survived a natural disaster. Although the symptoms manifest themselves differently in each person there are some commonalities seen in all three individuals. Looking at PTSD through the lens of an affected individual gives a detailed perspective into the interworking and thoughts they must cope with on a daily basis. In particular, reoccurring …show more content…
PTSD has been misunderstood by medical professionals as far as how to manage the treatment and recognize the symptoms before a person becomes suicidal. Often, in the past individuals with this illness has a common belief that because there is confusion within the very field they need to seek help from, that they are unable to identify with them to assist with the disease. With this in mind, it was not until the 80’s that PTSD was classified from as an actual mental health disorder. Therefore, we still have a ways to go in treating the disease effectively as evidenced in “Buried Above …show more content…
The producer and director of this film also has another documentary “A Summer In the Cage”, about a man suffering from bi-polar disorder which also discusses the flaws in the mental health system with regard to particularly complex diseases. As stated in, “Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Overview of Evidence-Based Assessment and Treatment,” Is PTSD primarily a biological or psychological phenomenon, and relatedly, are psychosocial or pharmacological treatments more appropriate? This question sets up a false dichotomy, as PTSD is rooted in both biological and psychological factors with regard to onset of symptoms, development of PTSD diagnosis, and maintenance of the disorder (Lancaster, Cynthia L. et al. 3). Uniquely, PTSD affects individuals on a variety of levels including those who experience different types of trauma (childhood abuse or events, war exposure, substance abuse, domestic violence, natural disasters, etc.) Moreover, because the brain, specifically, the amygdala, pre frontal cortex, and hippocampus are involved in the response to traumatic events; this results in a different response from each individual’s body who experiences a traumatic event or a series of traumatic events. Hence, the term chronic post traumatic stress disorder. In essence, the levels of hormones present such as:

Related Documents