The Four Noble Truths: The Noble Eightfold Path

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Around 500 BC, Buddhism was established in India and later migrated to Central Asia (Borchert 592). Siddhattha Gotama became the Buddha almost 3,000 years ago and said some rules in the religion would be changed. As a result of this, different sections of Buddhism branched out: Mahayana, Hinayana, and Theravada (Borchert 608). The Buddha thus gained enlightenment by scrutinizing the hidden meanings of the mind, universe and life. Upon reaching enlightenment through a deep level of meditation, he was free from worldly possessions and excessive desires. He dedicated a good part of his life to teaching the Dhamma, which is the Path of “the nature of things (Borchert 598).” Buddha teachings include: the way of Inquiry, the Four Noble Truths, the …show more content…
The way of Inquiry was taught to prevent people from entering a religion because of tradition. The Four Noble truths focuses on human suffering and how we can avoid it in order to attain happiness. The Noble Eightfold Path is the way to practice virtue in order to reach meditation and then attain enlightenment. Kamma or karma, states that our previous actions determine our current experiences. The consequences of kamma can be good or bad and in order to receive good kamma one should aim to perform good deeds to receive good karma in return. An individual should act within their morals to refrain from receiving bad kamma. The cycle of Rebirth focuses on our past lives and whether or not we lived a righteous life. It is a probable explanation as to why some individuals are granted a higher status in society than others. The Buddha never claimed to be a God and teaches that one is responsible for the outcome of their life (Berkwitz 249). The soul is an illusion to the Buddha and he claims it is the root of all suffering. Conclusion sentence for …show more content…
Our soul defines our true character and is responsible for the way we behave. The repercussions of our actions in the next life are determined by karma. The soul stays the same eternally but attaches to a different body in the next life

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