Effects Of Buddhism

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Buddhism was founded over 2,500 years ago by Siddhartha Gautama. Siddhartha Gautama quickly became known as Buddha meaning, “The Enlightened One”. Buddhism was not originally a religion, but rather a way of life. After the founding of the Buddhism, the way of life spread quickly across the world. To truly understand Buddhism one must know about the life of Buddha, the history of Buddhism, and how and where Buddhism spread.The spread of Buddhism had many effects on the world, especially China. These effects have molded Buddhism into the religion that is seen world wide today. Siddhartha Gautama was born in Nepal in the 6th century CE. Buddha was a spiritual man, leader, and teacher, whose life formed the basis of the Buddhist religion. …show more content…
In third century B.C.,the Ashoka empire was in rule, and Emperor Ashoka converts to the Buddhist religion. This spread of the Buddhist religion to Ashoka gained Buddhism many followers. Many wonder if this conversion was strategic to gain the respect of his followers, or if it was an honest conversion to a religion that spoke to him. Either way, the conversion of Emperor Ashoka was an effect of the spread of Buddhism on the Silk Roads. Emperor Ashoka built Buddhist schools, promoted vegetarianism, and supported the Buddhist religion overall. The Ashoka region became a center for Buddhist teachings and learnings. The region had many distinguished monks and scholars. Many traders would come to this region and would learn about the Buddhist teachings. Many of these traders would convert to Buddhism and take their new religion back to their home lands. This verbal communication from traders to their homeland people encouraged the spread of Buddhism worldwide. Many Buddhist texts were being translated into Chinese languages. This allowed for the religion to spread even more through written communication, not just oral. Buddhism flourished in China. Buddhism became an important part of the culture of China. Buddhism had an effect on Chinese “art, literature, sculpture, architecture, and philosophy.” Buddhist Chinese schools began to emerge. These schools taught the translated Buddhist teachings to their people. Some of the Chinese schools that were opened were the Chan and Pure Land schools. Meditation was emphasized at the Chan School as a way to gain insight and to experience Enlightenment in human life. The Pure Land School emphasized the practice of reciting the name Amitabha Buddha. The idea of the recitation is that if people recite his name and have sincere faith they can be reborn into the Pure Land where it is easier to achieve Enlightenment. Both of these schools became popular

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