Essay On Siddhartha Gautama's Four Noble Truths

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Today, everywhere we look we see some form of suffering. What is suffering? According to the Oxford dictionary, suffering is the state of undergoing pain, distress, or hardship. (Oxford Dictionary ) For example, many people don’t like the way they look, others don’t like the route that their life is taking, and some aren’t satisfied with their lives. Us humans, constantly search and search for different things to make us happy. However, we may think that we have found some form or another of that happiness but in reality we never will. Why can’t we find an end to this suffering and be happy with our self being? That is exactly what Siddhartha Gautama (Buddha) attempted to answer when he constructed the Four Noble Truths. The first noble is the truth of suffering The second one is the truth of the cause of suffering. The third is the truth of the end of …show more content…
Buddha’s four noble truths are generally the way that people bring an end to suffering in their lives and live a happier life. What we as humans may think that brings us happiness, in its entirely it really doesn’t. We may be illusioned by this but in reality we may never learn to be happy unless we follow the Eightfold path and take into thought Buddha’s four noble truths. Us humans can search for what we believe is happiness, in objects like a new car, computer, phone, clothing, etc. However, we will never stop suffering until we let go of those things and start learning to see life in a different perspective. That is exactly what Siddhartha Gautama (Buddha) attempted to answer when he came up with the Four Noble Truths. The first noble is the truth of suffering The second one is the truth of the cause of suffering. The third is the truth of the end of suffering. Finally, the fourth, the truth that frees us from suffering which is it the eight-fold path (O

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