Buddha's Eight Fold Path

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Buddha raised his voice against the ritualistic practices and attempted to simplify an already thriving religious system. Buddhism became famous for its message of compassion, non-violence, self-restraint, and love. Buddhism extended far and wide in the 6th century from Asia to the middle east becoming one of the largest followed religions. In 566 B.C., a young boy was born in Lumbini garden, his name was Siddartha Gautama, who would one day be known as Buddha. As a child Siddartha seemed detached from the world, his father tried to keep him away from all the suffering that was happening around him, such as illness and wars. Because his father did this Siddartha developed a deep compassion for nature, however, Siddartha was never happy …show more content…
The first part of the Eight-Fold Path is Right View; see things as they are and see them correctly based on the wisdom of Buddha. The second point is Right Thought; to remove all negatives and desires to free your mind from the evils. The third part is Right Speech; speak the truth to help free your mind and avoid the four evils of the mouth. The fourth part is Right Action; acting rightly to avoid the evils of the body. The fifth part of the Eightfold Path is Right Livelihood; living a life that avoids all harm, whether it be psychological or physical. The sixth point is Right Effort; making an effort to live an honest life following the ways of Buddha. The seventh point is Right mindfulness; seeing things as they are with a conscious and being aware of the moment and being focused on the moment in oneself. The eighth and final point of the Eightfold Path is Right Concentration; once the mind has been sorted and uncluttered it may be used to focus on a final direction, towards …show more content…
After Ashokar witnessed huge loss in lives in war he decided to turn to Buddhism. After this he bagan to include principles of Buddhism in his empire including a code of conduct call Dhamma. Ashokar was not only the reason Buddhism spread throughout India but was also the main reason Buddhism spread outside of India. Ashokar sent teams of missionaries all over the Indian sub-continent and also any nearby areas. Many of Ashokars missionaries were headed by his son, who traveled to Sri Lanka with a few other monks and was able to convert the king of Sri Lanka to Buddhism. This led to the translation of the Theravada canon into Sinhala. Buddhism has been the primary religion for Sri Lanka for nearly 1,000 years. Buddhism spread to China when a buddhist scholar, named Bodhi Dharma traveled from India to China in 475 CE. From the Kusha kingdom a monk began translating the Buddhist texts into Chinese in Lo-Yang, this eventually became the capital of the Han dynasty. From China Buddhism traveled south towards Japan and Korea, in 552 CE the state Paekche in Korea sent Buddhist texts to the emperor of Japan hoping they would join them in a war with Silla. Overtime Buddhism began to travel further east towards Europe and Africa eventually becoming one of the most practiced religions in the

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