Theme Of Compassion In Julius Caesar

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While compassion drives both leaders to take action, Brutus’ greater perseverance gives him more confidence, making him a better leader. A true leader holds compassion for his people. When the citizens of Rome are faced with a great threat, Brutus and Cassius are concerned. They fear that Roman’s will lose their true values of honor and virtue, and become imprisoned under Caesar’s reign. During a conversation with Brutus, Cassius states that he heard many “groaning underneath this age’s yoke, / [h]ave wished that noble Brutus had his eyes.” From listening to the complaints of the citizens, Cassius shows compassion by understanding that Caesar’s power was dangerous, and feeling eager to do something about it. With Caesar’s tyrant qualities …show more content…
An example of this would be during a conversation between Cassius and Brutus. Cassius states “And after this, let Caesar seat him sure, / [f]or we will shake him, or worse days endure.” Dreading the poor conditions Caesar was about to bring to Rome, Cassius seeks a solution, despite the coming difficulties he will face. Through perseverance, he is adamant that they must dethrone Caesar to rid the state of his ambitions, and restrain his harsh regulations. In another instance Brutus reveals ideas in his soliloquy. He says “It must be by his death. And for my part / I know no personal cause to spurn at him, / [b]ut for the general.” By deciding Caesar was not adequate for Rome, Brutus shows perseverance because of his desire to liberate the people from these future shackles. The love he has for Rome leads to the fact that the decision is not made for himself, but for the greater good. He comes to the realization that by eliminating Caesar, his power to do damage will be defeated. Another example is when Brutus believes it is for their army’s advantage to appear in Philippi before Antony’s men come. He tells Cassius “On such a full sea are we now afloat, / [a]nd we must take the current when it serves / or lose our ventures.” At his army’s highest peak, Brutus is determined that from this advantage, they have a better chance of victory. The fate of his state’s freedom lies in the result of this battle, and Brutus is determined to keep …show more content…
When one has strong belief in himself he will strive to reach his goals, despite obstacles faced. For example, In a disagreement with Brutus, Cassius says “Do / not consent / [t]hat Antony speak in his funeral. / Know you how much the people may be moved / [b]y that which he will utter?” He is confident in his judgement that Brutus’ approach to this situation is hazardous, and he believes that this speech will affect the citizens’ opinions towards them. Throughout the text, Cassius’ opinion proves valid, because Antony’s speech is corrupt. Another example is when speaking to his fellow conspirators, Brutus feels an oath is unnecessary. He states “If not the face of men, / [t]he sufferance of our souls, the time’s abuse / [i]f these be motives weak, break off betimes, / [a]nd every man hence to his idle bed.” Brutus has confidence that his decision to kill Caesar is for Rome, and does not feel the need to prove it to anyone. He does not need any more incentive, because he is committed to preventing the citizens from Caesar’s enslavement. Furthermore, after Caesar’s death Brutus says “[a]nd let us bathe our hands in Caesar’s blood / [u]p to the elbows and besmear our swords. / Then walk we forth, even into the marketplace, / [a]nd waving our red weapons o’er our heads, / [l]et’s all cry ‘[p]eace freedom and liberty!’” After killing Caesar, Brutus was confident in this public display. Committing this deed in the first place

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