Brutus Anti Federalist Papers

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The Anti-Federalist Papers, which is a series of articles against the formation of a large federal government, emerged after the United Sates Constitution was drafted. The Anti-Federalist Papers include the many concerns of a writer by the name of Brutus. As a response John Jay, Alexander Hamilton, and James Madison wrote multiple responses in favor of the formation of the federal government under one pen name; Publius. The examination of the Anti-Federalist Papers with the response of the Federalist Papers display the various agreements with overlapping ideals that were expressed after the creation of the United States Constitution. The competing works of Brutus and Publius demonstrate similar themes such as a supporting a limited and republican …show more content…
In Brutus’ first article he addresses the citizens of New York State with caution as he exposes the flaws of the United States government after their liberation from British rule. He draws attention to the importance of his fellow citizens’ stance on the adaptation of the Constitution. Brutus states that “the most important question that was ever proposed to your decision, or to the decision of any people under heaven, is before you, and you are to decide upon it by men of your own election, chosen specially for this purpose.” (Brutus, 1787) With regards to the importance of representatives, creating a government with an unequal amount of representatives is proposed to be a problem. Brutus discusses hesitation of the unrealistic production of a republic that fairly represents the diversity of the thirteen states, both in character, and population. (Brutus, 1787) Brutus gives examples of how free republics are easily turned into tyrannical governments in order to strengthen the argument of his concerns. The reference of the Grecian and Roman republics started as free governments, but as their lands expanded, so did the powers of one individual. (Brutus, 1787) Through the formation of a republican government in a large and versatile landmass, the rise of a tyrant is plausible, especially if the federal government is not limited in the appropriate …show more content…
He states that due to the written constitution that has been proposed, the state governments are seemingly obsolete due to the specified authority of the United States government. (Brutus, 1787) Without the state governments actively involved in the lawmaking that affects their citizens, the federal government is given the opportunity to make laws that can damage certain groups of people. This includes the powers of the state court system, due to the Supreme Court’s independence from state jurisdiction. If human actions replicate those of the Grecian and Roman republics, a Brutus suggests they will, the judicial powers will be able to obtain the powers that had previously been held by state courts due to the lack of restraints placed upon the federal courts. (Brutus, 1787) Another example that Brutus gives of the possible actions of this limitless government is vested in the powers of taxation. In the event that a tax should be proposed by a state in order to pay their debts, Congress may use the Necessary and Proper Clause mention in the eighth section of the Constitution to repeal this law. (Brutus, 1787) In this scenario that Brutus gives, “the government of a particular state might be overturned at one stroke, and thereby be deprived of every means of its support.” (Brutus, 1787) By the lack of

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