The Broken Window Theory

Decent Essays
Caudill, J. W., Getty, R., Smith, R., Patten, R., & Trulson, C. R. (2013) Discouraging window breakers: The lagged effects of police activity on crime. Journal of Criminal Justice, 41(1), 18-23.
The Broken Windows Theory has produced a lot of mixed results towards the ideas that crime can be reduced in poor neighborhoods through crime reductions strategy. Wilson and Kelling (1982) who introduced the Broken Windows theory, suggested that social disorder in neighborhoods was the primary source of why crimes occurred. Unfortunately, Order-maintenance policing is needed to reduce more extreme disorder that leads to more serious crime. Caudill, Getty, Smith, Patten, and Trulson (2013) used previous research of Broken Window theory to conduct a
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Jefferson (2016) thinks that the way police talk about crime should be reevaluated. Questions were conducted in meetings with police and attendees to get a look of what the people thought was disorderly. Most of the issues that were talked about was usually low-level disorders like loud noises, traffic issues, people loitering and drug issues. Almost none of the issues were serious crime issues. The people wanted the police to crack down more effectively on these kinds of disorders (Jefferson, 2016). Jefferson (2016) emphasizes “that deconstructing the way police portray space and crime provides signpost for substantive reform to broken windows.” (p. …show more content…
Weisburd, Hinkle, Braga, and Wooditch (2015) focused on the tools that would be more useful in the reduction of crime that would have a long-term effect. Two key components of crime control for the broken windows theory was fear and receding informal or community social controls (Weisburd, Hinkle, Braga, & Wooditch, 2015). The authors performed a meta-analysis on previous studies of fear on crime and of community social controls to determine whether either of these two components reduced crime. Their review of the evidence shows that there was little evidence that fear and social controls had for long-term reduction crime (Weisburd et al., 2015).
Regardless of their reviews, they assessed that there might be other elements or tools that correlates with the crime reduction studies that took place when these previous studies were conducted (Weisburd et al., 2015). Like reduction in opportunity, deterrence, or incapacitation. The authors argue that “for the crime prevention gains of disorder policing to be attributed to broken windows policing, it needs to be shown that crime has declined because of reductions in fear and increase in informal social controls.” (p.603)
Welsh, B. C., Braga, A. A., & Bruinsma, G. J. N. (2015) Reimagining broken windows: From theory to policy. Journal

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