British Rule Over India Dbq Analysis

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The British first began moving into India by setting up trade posts in Bombay, Madras, and Calcutta. When the Mughal Empire collapsed, the British East India Company moved in and took over. The company had an army of sepoys run by British officers. India was treasured greatly by the British due to ir being a major supplier of raw materials and full of potential buyers for British made products. Although Britain's administrative control over India was efficient, leading to a massive increase in trade and peace between minorities and people of different religions, British rule over India served the needs of the English over the Indians, resulting in a government designed to restrict independance and divide religious groups, decrease trade for …show more content…
Lalavni states that “India’s success as the world’s largest democracy was largely due to British imperial rule, and the framework for their government and police-force they provided.” But the framework didn’t include Indian’s, “Of 960 civil offices… 900 are occupied by Englishman and only 60 by natives”(Doc 2). The entire government was run by a hand-full of men who have no permanent interest in the wellbeing of the Indians. The entire government was built to favor the British and control the Indians. In addition, an army of Indian soldiers was formed by the British, and new military academies were formed. The army was used only to restrict and control Indians, by enforcing repressive laws created by a British-run government. Laws such as the Rowlett Act that prohibited Indians from attending public protests. When they violated this law with a gathering in Amristar, 400 Indians were brutally murdered by the military and 1600 were severely wounded(Gandhi). After this tragedy any faith the Indians had in the British was erased(Gandhi). The army was used not for Indian protection, but to oppress

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