British Colonialism Analysis

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T. S. Eliot, a essayist, once said, “The historical sense involves a perception, not only of the pastness of the past, but of its presence” (“Four Quartets by Eliot”). The British have colonized Canada from 1763 to 1867, which greatly impacted the lives of both countries. During this period of colonization it sparked various unique personal experiences and perspectives for the Canadians and British. With that context, how do differing perspectives help us to understand the British colonization of Canada? Differing perspectives allows one to perceive multiple sides of the story which one can use along with historical evidence to determine what truly happened in the past. The research question will be answered by exploring and comparing the First …show more content…
The First Nations perspective provides an insight into their lives and the various negative impacts they experienced during the British colonialism. While the British trader’s perspective display the benefits they gained from the British colonization of Canada. As obtained from The First Nations perspective their lives were lousy, their religion and resources were all forcibly taken from them, the British colonization was a time of hardships for them. While from the British traders perspective, it is shown that their lives have drastically improved after the British colonization to the accessibility of resources and trade routes. Both perspectives and interdependent, yet they present different experiences, the impairment of the First Nations and the British trader’s benefits. All from one common cause, the British colonization of Canada. Differing these perspectives gives a view into the different lives both populations experienced. Interpreting different perspectives is crucial in one’s sense of the British colonization of Canada. One could differ the First Nation and British trader perspective to be aware of the multiple sides of the colonization. While using their own historical knowledge, one will develop their own perspective which can allow one to grasp the knowledge of the British colonization on Canada. Because one uses the …show more content…
This is proven by the British perspective and the First Nations perspective and how it allows one to comprehend both sides in order to fully understand the British colonization of Canada. Perspectives are not only crucial in history but also in one’s life, the ability to see beyond their own prospect will allow them to understand our unique world to a deeper breadth. Historical perspectives are constantly impacting the current world, without them our awareness towards the world will be limited. Without differing perspectives, how distant will one’s world be compared to our current state of

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