Bright Ideas, Brighter Future In Death Of A Salesman By Arthur Miller

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Bright Ideas, Brighter Future Our whole lives are dedicated to time and opportunity; inevitably to reach our own goals, dreams and values into furthering our success. In essence, one must be able to manage and fulfill these various, distinct aspects in shaping our own identity by which success plays a significant role within our lives. That being said, one might take on a challenge whether it be good or bad in forthcoming the harshest of reality. When an individual sets a high standard of success, then they must forcibly overcome the many obstacles in their present time which ultimately serves to create a successful life, as they continue to shape who truly are. However, some people might value one of the aspects over another, which …show more content…
The relationship between these various aspects are predominantly found in the play Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller, which is solely based on a typical American family's ego portraying an extreme craving for success and top …show more content…
Success, evidently becomes a dominant self-fulfilling failure. Accordingly to Willy, he fancys his perception undermining the value of success quickly and surely without any sympathetic signs of passion or pride. As Willy's illusion deteriorates, so does his identity built on that illusion, in which he succumbed to the fate of his own reality. Realistically, when individuals embody skewed values, and fail to acknowledge the truth, it becomes easier for them to justify their actions and it gives them a false sense of pride, self-confidence, and entitlement. Ideally, when we talk about the standard of living and just how we might be able to excel at our best, it is imperative that we do not give up on our hopes and dreams, and proper instincts in order to preserve great success and create and maintain a meaningful life. Former American author, political activist, and lecturer, Helen Keller once said “Many persons have the wrong idea of what constitutes true happiness. It is not attained through self-gratification but through fidelity to a worthy purpose.” Judging by this statement, it also evokes the many families who have tried and willingly put the American Dream on the line, typically those of the Loman

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