Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Analysis

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Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Essay
The Myers-Briggs theory was developed by mother-daughter team, Katharine Briggs and Isabel Briggs Myers, as an adaptation to Carl Jung’s psychological types. According to Corey and Schneider Corey (2014), Jung’s theory included that “both constructive and destructive forces coexist in the human psyche, and to become integrated we must accept the shadow side of our nature with our primitive impulses such as selfishness and greed” (p. 11). The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) indicates that individuals fall into one of 16 categories determined by four opposing preferences: (1) the way an individual directs and receives energy- extraversion vs introversion, (2) the way the person prefers to take in information- sensing vs intuition, (3) how one decides and comes to conclusions- thinking vs feeling, and (4) the way the person approaches the outside world- judging vs perceiving (Hirsh & Kummerow, 1998, p. 2). Hirsh and Kummerow (1998) explain that
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They interpreted that people fall into one of 16 categories determined by four opposing preferences: (1) the way an individual directs and receives energy- extraversion vs introversion, (2) the way the person prefers to take in information- sensing vs intuition, (3) how one decides and comes to conclusions- thinking vs feeling, and (4) the way the person approaches the outside world- judging vs perceiving (Hirsh & Kummerow, 1998, p. 2). Our scores can be influenced by one’s upbringing, current situation or environment, or even key important figures in their lives. Barger, Kirby, and Kummerow (1997) state that our MBTI score “can expand our understanding of our own and others’ functioning in important ways: the need for balance in our personalities, the importance of a well-developed core identiry, and an innate drive for growth” (p.

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