Breast Feeding Persuasive Argument

862 Words 4 Pages
“Anybody offended by breastfeeding is staring too hard” (Guillemets, Teri. “The Quote Garden.” QuoteGarden.com N.P. 18 Mar. 1998. Web. 6 Oct. 2017). What could possibly be wrong about a mother breast feeding her child in public? Absolutely nothing. A mother should have the ability to nurse her child at any time and any place. Many still find this an issue in today’s society and continue to view this act as disrespectful or not be courteous to others. Breast feeding should be accepted publicly because it is a beautiful and natural thing to do and not see breasts as a sexual item. Also, it offers endless benefits to both mother and child and how it can affect us economically. Every human was born from their mother’s womb and most likely …show more content…
Not only is it natural but it is creating a stronger bond between a mother and a child. It’s nobody’s business to judge this action as being indecent or disrespectful. Some people don’t like seeing a woman feeding her child in public because it makes them feel uncomfortable. Also, I believe people may think this way because, over time, breasts have become very sexualized. A woman’s privacies have been exposed everywhere in movies, television, and magazines. No one seems to mind that one bit, yet seeing a baby next to a pair of breasts people are easily offended. Any parent having their child asking questions, seeing this in public, should embrace this natural occurrence and explain it to them. This could help our future generations to understand the benefits of breast feeding and how it can help their child when they have their …show more content…
Along with the health benefits breastfeeding has to offer, through Weimer’s Analysis, many economic benefits have been discovered through various studies. While the Nutritional Program for Women, Infants, and Children, known as the WIC program, promotes breastfeeding, they are “the largest purchaser of infant formula” in the United States, buying approximately 40 percent of all formula sold” (Weimer 3). The formula that was purchased and distributed by the WIC program in 1997 alone cost $567 million. This was after rebates were given from the formula companies. The General Accounting Office (GAO) estimated that even “a 10 percent increase in breastfeeding rates” would save the WIC program up to $750,000 (Weimer 4). Not only will breastfeeding help reduce government spending, but a family can save more money in purchasing formulas. According to the U.S Department of Health and Human Services, families have reduced their spending in the first year by up to $1,500 and this doesn’t even include the hospitals cost for visits pertaining to medical problems that could have been avoided (United States 3). We need to start embracing breastfeeding in public as normal, natural, and healthy. This could encourage mothers to breastfeed more and we would all benefit from it in the long run. By denying a mother’s right, the chain of benefits begins to fail, which is like a “domino effect” of negative outcomes (Rachel Strelchuk

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