What Are The Similarities Between Bernard Marx And John The Savage

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The novel “Brave New World”, written in 1931 by Aldous Leonard Huxley is a dystopian novel depicting London in the future. World State is part of a totalitarian regime under the 10 controllers. By using technology they manufacture people and condition them to do what they supposed to do. Freedom is eliminated and people are divided into 5 social classes which decide their destiny. Bernard Marx, Lenina Crowne and John the Savage are the main characters in the novel and play an important role to the society. This essay will analyze the main characters and compare and contrast focusing on their personalities, relationships in the themes of Brave New World. Bernard Marx is an important character in the novel. He is an Alpha-plus working in the …show more content…
By comparing Bernard, Lenina and John it becomes clear that they all have different perspective to the society. Bernard and John hate soma and do not take them whereas Lenina deals with the soma to earn happiness and knock out from the problem and even convinces Bernard to take soma. Although Lenina decides not to cause argument and prefers to be conditioned to society, Bernard and John are both outsiders in their societies. Bernard does not feel that he fits in the society due to his small height than the other Alphas and makes him differ from the other members. John also does not fit into World State either the Reservation. Although Bernard and John are outsiders in their society, Bernard frantically want to fit into the New World, John does not want to become a part of the society rejects the shallow happiness of the New World. Bernard, Lenina and John have different values to physical pleasure. Unlike Bernard and John, Lenina enjoys physical pleasure and easily attracted to men. As stated earlier, the purpose of this paper was to analyze the main characters and compare and contrast focusing on their personalities, relationships in the themes of Brave New World. Bernard suffers with inferiority toward his caste and although he has been conditioned, he is constantly longing for freedom. Lenina however, is a true produce of the Brave New World, she prefers to live as a silent member of the social stability. She show traditional human emotions and sees sex as only a casual involvement. As opposed to Lenina, John the Savage is a symbol of pitted against Utopia. John is not scientifically conditioned and knows that the true happiness comes from the knowledge that one has value but not soma. However, he suffers in the dehumanized society of Dystopia and chooses to suicide. Three main characters in the novel had shown us the concern of Aldous

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