Brand and High-involvement Products Essay

847 Words Sep 12th, 2013 4 Pages
Low Involvement VS High Involvement Buying Decisions
——The Consumer’s Decision-Making Process

Why do you buy the things you do? How did you decide to go to the college you’re attending? Where do like to shop and when? Do your friends shop at the same places or different places?

Marketing professionals want to know the answers to these questions. They know that once they do have those answers, they will have a much better chance of creating and communicating about products that you and people like you will want to buy. That’s what the study of consumer behavior is all about.

Consumers don’t necessarily go through all the buying stages when they’re considering purchasing product. You have probably thought about many products you
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Companies that sell high-involvement products are aware of that postpurchase dissonance can be a problem. Frequently, they try to offer consumers a lot of information about their products, including why they are superior to competing brands and how they won’t let the consumer down. Salespeople are typically utilized to do a lot of customer “hand-holding.”

Limited problem solving falls somewhere in the middle. Consumers engage in Limited problem solving when they already have some information about a good or service but continue to search for a bit more information. The backpack you’re looking to buy is an example. You’re going to spend at least some time looking for one that’s decent because you don’t want it to fall apart while you’re traveling and dump everything you’ve packed on a hiking trail. You might do a little research online and come to a decision relatively quickly. You might consider the choices available at your favorite retail outlet but not look at every backpack at every outlet before making a decision. Or, you might rely on the advice of a person you know who’s knowledgeable about backpacks. In some way you shorten the decision-making process.

Brand names can be very important regardless of the consumer’s level of purchasing involvement. Consider a low-versus high-involvement product—say, purchasing a tube of toothpaste versus a new

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