Bourbon Monarchy, France, And Louis XIV And The War Of Spanish Succession

1791 Words 8 Pages
In actuality, one can predominantly deduce that within the confines of any conflict between nations, lies the failure of international relations. Furthermore, in the late 17th Century, Europe had fashioned itself a tenuous balance of power, as each empire anticipated for the pseudo-armistice to vanish so another attempt for European hegemony (and ultimately) global mastery could begin. Thus, this was the fundamental basis for both the Bourbon Monarchy (France) and the Habsburg Empire (Austria) in The War of Spanish Succession. Moreover, the desire to attain Spain would lead to an global war, where a myriad of nations each beholding their own motives, endeavored to either restore the quasi-peace that Europe had possessed, or plummet into another …show more content…
Moreover, Louis XIV was quite perceiving of the imperative geopolitical blunder France had succumbed to, as Habsburg encirclement had absolutely entrenched his aspiration for further French advancement. Nonetheless, with the impending demise of the inept Charles II, his objective would become for his grandson, Philip of Anjou (Philip V), to profit from Habsburg loss. Correspondingly, any method of a French venture to the throne of Spain would be presumed as an act of aggression by the Habsburg Monarchy, thus instantaneously prompting a confrontation. Conversely, Louis XIV was enamored with the dogmata that perchance France would become the sole principle of Europe, and in due course gain global mastery. Moreover, if he did not take the initiative to expeditiously utilize the will of Charles II, then it was blatant that Spain would once again be controlled by those with Anti-French …show more content…
Likewise, France also had an overwrought affiliation with Britain, as akin to the Habsburgs, they had also conducted various campaigns against one another. For approximately two decades, England utilized all her resources and devices to consolidate the assiento with Spain. This sanctioned a contract between the English and Spaniards where one would endow slaves for Spanish colonies in America, and receive remuneration in return. Subsequently, once Charles II perished and the Bourbon Monarchy attained Spain, they would become regulators of the West India Trade, virtually jettisoning Britain, and besmirching their fickle relations. Consequently, when the reign of Philip of Anjou became an irrevocability, and France’s swelling supremacy in Europe endangered English aspirations, they would side with Leopold and the Anti-French coalition to halt French encroachment and conceivably salvage influence in the Spanish American Trade. Similarly, analogous to the preponderance of nations at the time, Britain preferred neither Habsburg or French hegemony, for it merely aligned with Austria due to Louis XIV’s both injudicious and reckless foreign policies that tarnished France’s relations with the entirety of Europe solely for his monarchies

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