Borat Documentary

Great Essays
The simplistic definitions of what documentary and mockumentary are has caused audiences to become cynical to what truth there is in factual films. The film ‘Borat: Cultural learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan’ directed by Larry Charles also known simply as Borat combines both fact and fiction while using mockumentary styling. Documentary is described as a creative treatment of actuality. Mockumentary is known as a fictional narrative that takes the form of a documentary. In having such thin definitions for the genre and subgenre it has resulted in films such as Borat being difficult to categorize into a genre. Borat could easily fall under both definitions. This has resulted in the debate of what genre the …show more content…
This is with the intention of bringing back aspect of American culture to reform Kazakhstan 's culture. While in America Borat discovers ‘CJ Parker’ from Baywatch and decides to travel to California to marry Pamela Anderson, the actor who plays CJ. There are only four actors within the film, Sacha Baron Cohen as Borat, Kevin Davitian as Borats producer Azamat, Lunell as Lunell the prostitute and Pamela Anderson as herself. The majority of the film is Borat interacting with Americans in a highly offensive portrayal of Kazakhstani people. The reactions to the portrayal of Borat within the film are true and show how easily the stereotypical portrayal is …show more content…
Inserting the comedic portrayal into interactions with the public makes the serious subject matter very palatable to the audience. The representation of a Kazakhstani journalist who defecates into a bag, whose national anthem akins other countries to ‘little girls’, and who believes so firmly that women have a smaller brain which makes them the lesser sex create creates truth in being fiction. This truth is that the American population largely believes in the primitive portrayal of Kazakhstani people. This indicates that the American population does not know of the state of the rest of the world and will believe simply because they are told. The opening scene of Borat shows a poverty stricken city, Borat walks amongst the population with a monologue. This use of an individual walking through devastated area of the world is a common feature in international journalism. With Borats outlandish commentary on the town overlapped with footage it becomes clear to the audience that the content is fictional. However this comedy does not necessarily transfer to those who interact with Borat. The interaction both display a patients for other cultures as well as a volatile response when lines are

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    However, not only is it unfair to expect perfection of historical accuracy in films, it is impossible. This can be attributed to multiple factors. Firstly, Bluestone argues that content of a film and novel cannot be expected to transpose from one medium to another (Preface VIII). This is because the two mediums differ vastly from each other. Therefore, it is problematic to compare the two.…

    • 1051 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    As a result, several revisions have been gradually taken place by the censorship board realising the importance of films to engage into a more accurate diversified representations and its commercial potentials. Nevertheless, the constrains between the censors and filmmakers become an ongoing struggles that continued to be highlighted in terms of what it is considered to be acceptable to social and cultural norm, however, to regard censorship as an isolated institution that is contradicting to the freedom of expression is reductive. According to Kuhn (1998), the censorship board is an institution which “…only part of a larger assemble of institutions, practices, powers and relations; they participate, in short, in an apparatus” (Kuhn, 1998, p 12). In analysing the rationale of censorship practice in Malaysia, it is important to investigate the mechanism of censors in relation to other social, cultural and religious institutions and how it shaped the established measures. This strategy is not only crucial to reveal possible mitigating act by filmmakers through creative and thematic strategies in filmmaking whether consciously or unconsciously performed through self-censorship but to account for the influences of other social institutions to the issues of…

    • 1671 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Euripides 's Medea is an overly dramatized anti-feminist play that borders on portraying prejudices against women as outlandish comedy. To modern readers like the ones in our Gender and Sexuality class at Lick, Medea can come across as comic, but this reaction does not mean that our society is “post-sexist”; there are definitely still many people who agree with the prejudices the play presents. But although Medea can come across as stereotypical in that Medea is the overly-emotional woman and Jason is the overly-logical man, the ancient play still exposes gender roles in a way that is recognizable today; we laugh at the ridiculousness because we are still familiar with such absurd sexism in modern society. Medea’s responses to Jason’s actions…

    • 1312 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    Criticisms of Nanook of the North and Dead Birds: Worries of Authenticity and Lasting Implications Films have been seen as windows for everyday people to experience and see new and different things. With ethnographic documentary films, people are able to see real parts of the world that are not always visible in their current, everyday lives. Nanook of the North (Robert Flaherty, 1922) and Dead Birds (Robert Gardner, 1963) are both ethnographic documentaries, revered as revolutionary for their times and carry many similarities and differences. However, both films faced negative criticisms, such as with concerns of authenticity and the lasting negative connotations left on the people after the film’s release. Nanook of the North is the first…

    • 1843 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Dividing film theory into the dichotomy of two very broad categories, realism and formalism, does have it merit but only in the simplification of information. By stating that Andre Bazin is a realist and Sergei Eisenstein is a formalist on who is largely unfamiliar with their works is able to compile a rough list of attributes and beliefs that may relate to each theorist; however, these label can act as a subterfuge, masking the beliefs of Bazin and Eisenstein that do not fit into these categories and creating an often unnecessary tension between their theories. Bazin and Eisenstein agreed, to an extent, on several important aspect or issues in cinema. For example, like all of the theorists that we have read this semester, they both understand…

    • 1210 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Cloning In The Media

    • 1454 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Lastly, the media’s thirst for entertainment leads to the metaphorical, evil representation of clones and how they fit into society. According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), one of the nation’s leading research institute for biological information, the media’s inaccurate portrayal of clones comes from their “need to create importance and meaning comes television 's predilection to fall back on metaphors when dealing with the debate on human cloning” (Cloning in the Media and Popular Culture). Filmmakers and directors need to make their film interesting and appealing to the public and what better way…

    • 1454 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    Discuss how dreams and desires function to define ‘identity’ in Bonnie and Clyde (Penn, 1967). How do specific environments impinge on, or create opportunity for, the characters? How does this relate to the notion of making particular American movies, and putting America on the screen? Deconstructing identity into only two simplistic ideals, dreams and desires, is an extremely minimalistic approach to assessing the identity of characters within Bonnie and Clyde (Penn, 1967). Whilst the dreams and desires of the two fugitive protagonists may indeed shape their identity it is also important to question how these two aspects fuel their actions.…

    • 1596 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This episode sheds a light on a serious problem in America and that is inequality between men and women. This episode has great cultural and literary value. The role of women in America has been suppressed and The Simpsons used their comedy to convey a very important message which is that women are just as smart if not more intelligent than men and should be treated as equals. By showing both Marge and Lisa getting discriminated it shows that Marge was ignored because of who she is but because she is women. Having both Lisa and Marge being shunned by men it shows what The Simpsons really think about the American society and how women have…

    • 798 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    However, Mitch lets a little thing such as Blanche’s past ruin what could have been a happy ending for him, just because by society 's standards Blanche was not “clean enough.” Stanley’s rape of Blanche and its outcome also helps support the argument that Blanche is not the enemy. Stanley rapes Blanche because he resents her for thinking she is smarter and better than him. Finding out about her soiled past makes him feel entitled to harm her. Blanche’s believed superiority over Stanley is made clear quite frequently. Blanche even refers to Stanley as a survivor of the stone age, likening him to an ape and urges her sister not to,"hang back with the brutes.”(118).…

    • 1561 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In reference to the male characters, the lack of pronouns within their labels segregates them from their gender. The female names however, have a direct correlation to their gender due to the pronoun ‘Miss’, suggesting that their names are derived from Jeff’s rather cynical view of women. This is accentuated when Jeff contends that Miss Torso is ‘like a queen bee with her pick of the drones’, condemning Miss Torso for her perceived sins. Lisa, through a feminist lens, suggests that ‘she’s doing a woman’s hardest job- juggling wolves’, shifting the audience’s moral attention to Miss Torso’s male occupants. At the end of the film it is discovered that Jeff’s original opinion of Miss Torso was utterly wrong and that Lisa was in fact right when she suggested that Miss Torso ‘ [wasn’t] in love with [...] any of…

    • 1121 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays