Gone With The Wind Book Analysis

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Our world today has become arrogant, sensitive, and critical. Books are being banned in result of the sensitivity of our nation, including the novel Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell. The novel takes place in the south during the Civil War era and follows a young woman’s romantic life and her survival through the war. She pursues the love of her life while in doing so must fight for her survival in the war plagued south. Despite the immense amounts of history in the novel, some believe the controversial content outweighs the history and therefore should be banned. Our critical world overlooks the accurate historical content and puts a spotlight on the sensitive topics. The hypersensitivity of the readers has led to the banning of not …show more content…
Many have challenged the book over it’s realism believing it is too graphic. Although violence and gore were present in Gone with the Wind, it was not excessive, and there was only enough to create an accurate depiction of the war. Margaret Mitchell became very knowledgeable of the Civil War through her grandfather, whom was in the Confederate Army. Kim O’Connell states that “it [the Civil War] showed up in books as it showed up in the lives of those who survived” (2). Margaret Mitchell used the details of her father’s war stories as a direct source for her novel no matter the amount of violence or gore. The authenticity and history in the novel are enough to overlook the violence and gore in the novel. The Civil War is known for being one of the bloodiest and most violent wars in history, but with that being said, Mitchell found a way to get that point across without focusing directly on the …show more content…
Often it 's challenged by those who feel offended by the language. Language can be a problem in certain circumstances, such as novels that include language that is unnecessary to the plot. Many accusations have been made that the language in Gone with the Wind is racially demoralizing and are discriminatory. The only problem with those accusations are that they took the words out of context. Most can agree that the n-word is a very offensive word, but when it 's used in the context of the novel, the word describes and characterizes how upper-class Southerners treated blacks in that time period. Elizabeth Leonard explains in her article "Slavery in Literature", that racially discriminating words in literature are present, but to only better describe what the slaves had to endure. Mitchell conscientiously put the n-word and other language in Gone with the Wind to describe to the reader the harsh treatment of slaves. The purpose of the language in the novel was to give the audience a more in-depth look at vernacular of the time period rather than antagonize them. The language used in Gone with the Wind does not justify it 's banning, but instead proves the importance of language in learning about the Civil

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