Booker T. Washington's Up From Slavery

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Booker T. Washington acted as a leader for the African American community and freed slaves. He himself was the last black leader and advocate born into slavery; he served as a voice for the final generation of slaves. His primary goal was centered around improving the African American community through education and development of skill related to any field of industrial work. Washington wrote the autobiography, Up From Slavery, as a way of addressing the fight for equality of African Americans in early 20th century America. W.E.B. Du Bois was a civil rights activist and served as a voice for the black community in the early 20th century. He was also the co-founder of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). His primary focus was to fight for the rights of African Americans, so that they can have equal opportunity in their progression in America. Du Bois wrote the book, The Souls of Black Folk, which highlighted what is was like to be black …show more content…
Up From Slavery, was written by the former slave Booker T. Washington and through his experience as a former slave growing to become a respected individual he constructed the idea that blacks should improve on their industrial skill. W.E.B. Du Bois expressed in his collection of essays, that blacks shouldn 't just become skilled industrial workers, but rather improve on their education through higher institutions. Although both authors were black and experienced what it was like to be black in the early 20th century, their ideas about African American progression differed greatly because of their different upbringings and resulting beliefs. Washington being a former slave and thus believed a lot of what his previous master believed, and Du Bois who grew up in a household of former slaves and witnessed what whites and white culture have done to

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