Booker T Washington Research Paper

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Register to read the introduction… Washington was in control of many black newspapers that agreed with his views and opinions. Many black leaders such as W.E.B Du Bois and William Monroe Trotter did not see eye to eye with Washington and he was believed to be getting in the way of other black group movements. At this time Washington felt that his leadership in the black community depended on the help of white leaders and his wittiness to use them for what he needed. He secretly tried to overturn the grandfather clause, and (the fact that he could), kept his popularity with the whites. To the end of his life, many blacks started to question his loyalty to the black communities and whites really did not remember him, and only thought of him as a black …show more content…
He was known for his strong personality, his straight forwardness and harsh opinions. Fortune was one who believed in the fight for black rights and he fought to gain equality for blacks. In the fight against injustice, Fortune urged women to support of the National African American League to help gain political power and equality. Fortune even hired Ida B. Wells Barnett as an anti-lynching writer for the "Globe". At this time, fortune was considered a radicalist and Washington was considered as being safe and reasonable. In 1907, Fortune sold his newspaper "The Age" and then his years of being a great leader came to an end. On June 2, 1928 in Philadelphia at his home he passed …show more content…
In 1895, Wells went on another tour through the northern and western states. With lynching on the rise blacks in the South grew quite weary of lynching. A person could be lynched for violating a labor contract, shooting rabbits or would be falsely accused of a crime that he or she did not commit. Based on the Chicago Tribute Annual Summary, one out of every five lynchings was based on black accused of raping a white women. The "moral monster", was an excuse to oppress African Americans by racist whites. They wanted them to fit into society as an outcast race, "beyond pale human sympathy". Wells role in the NAACP was that of an activist fighting for all possible rights. Ida B. Well's kept up her fight for black equality for all African-Americans. Her fight stayed alive for some time until mutual friends such as Washington and Fortune decided to push her out of newspaper journalism for black rights and eventually out of the

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