Booker T Washington And The Civil Rights Movement

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Since the birth of our nation, African Americans have undergone significant changes from slavery, the Reconstruction era and eventually the civil rights movement. These battles have been fought by prominent leaders both black and white. Some examples of early African American struggles include vicious crimes from southern whites that resulted in nearly zero prosecutions, voting rights controlled by violence and intimidation and sharecropping which kept them in debt. Certain laws were ignored and some were enacted to keep African Americans in a servitude role. These obstacles seemed impossible to overcome yet were fought by a courageous group and rallied an oppressed group together to fight for not only their civil rights but equality as human …show more content…
Washington was born into slavery. As a young boy, he received his freedom when Congress passed the Thirteenth Amendment. In 1881, Washington accepted the position as the President of the Tuskegee Institute. Through hard work, Washington became one of the most respected black men of his time. The Institute taught specialized trade skills, and also instilled cleanliness of the student’s body and living area. Booker T. stressed to his students that a special skill and hard work would get any person respect regardless of race, color, or gender. His address at the Atlantic Cotton Exposition inspired both black and white people to work together. Washington uses a parabola of a vessel searching and finding drinkable water. All the ship had to do was cast down their buckets where they were and fresh water from the Amazon River would be available. He is telling the Negro people they don’t have to move to northern states but need to have specialized skills and good work ethic to become a productive, valuable member of the southern society. To the white members in the audience, he is saying that one-third of the community is African American, they have been loyal for hundreds of years, and the Negro people should be hired for work. W.E.B Dubois was a critic of Washington, and believed only the elite ten percent could lead African Americans out of …show more content…
Once again the Fourteenth Amendment came into play, the Supreme Court ruled it unconstitutional, that a state has to provide equal protection regardless of race. Texas law school tried to maneuver around court order ruling to admit Herman Sweat into their law program. The school created a separate facility that consisted of three rooms, a small library, few instructors, and no other students. The Supreme Court case Sweat VS Painter was decided in 1950 the court ruled that the Texas law school deprived Sweat of intangible resources such as opportunities to deal with other law students and professionals in his professions, which are important ingredients to become a successful lawyer. In 1950, Harry Briggs a navy veteran and twenty-four other individuals decided to sue Clarendon Counties school district for segregation in elementary schools. The case Briggs VS Elliot was the first challenge to desegregate elementary schools in the South. The NAACP led by Thurgood Marshall, combined the Briggs VS Elliot case with four other cases that appeared around the country. Finally in 1954, Brown VS Board of Education case was ruled unanimously. Segregation in schools based on race was unconstitutional to the Fourteenth Amendment. The Brown decision would be used in future cases in dismantling Jim Crow laws that plagued the south for nearly a

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