Body Cameras

1811 Words 8 Pages
In early July, the death of a civilian under the hands of the police in the U.S. occurred. Philando Castile, who was only 32 years old, was fatally shot by police officers from the passenger seat of his girlfriend’s car. According to an ABC News article by Julia Jacobo and Enjoli, the police officer planned to stop the vehicle Castile was in because he unethically assumed that Castile and the driver were robbers based on racial profiling (par. 4). After the officer killed Castile, the driver live-streamed the aftermath scene on her Facebook account and states that the officer assumed Castile was pulling out a gun instead of his wallet and shot him four times in the process. Philando Castile was fatally shot based on uncertain and false pretences. …show more content…
Many cases arise where police or the civilian can not recall certain events or specific details that occurred in the situation and the police body cameras will solve that and provide a valuable extra piece of information for misconduct situations. The investment may prove to be costly, but can end up saving law enforcement time and money because body cameras can prevent court trials based on misinformation. The body cameras can help strengthen and enhance transparency and accountability in the police department. Police can also feel further protected from the possibility of false complaints. (Ferrarin, par. 2) They will be a great tool for completing reports and there will be less room for lying on both parts or exaggerating events that went down. If both parties are aware that their actions can be seem through the cameras, this can curb misbehaving. When people know that they are under surveillance, they tend to cooperate more than they would without it. With body cameras, police departments have the ability to complete more thorough review of cases, investigations, and can compare police misconduct …show more content…
“Broader training and psychological testing of officers and uniform reporting standards for accusations of brutality” are recommended to be best in solving this dilemma of the excessive use of force (Sullivan). Developing mental health issues after being appointed as a police officer can play a big and ultimately negative part on how police handle and react in dangerous situations. For example, a police officer who has developed generalized anxiety disorder after five years of being in the police force may react to situations differently, and negatively, compared to someone who does not have it. According to Worden, it is implicitly presumed that the outlooks or personalities of these officers are at the root of their seemingly distinctive behavioral patterns (152). Even though having more requirements or restrictions may cause us to have less police officers as a whole, it will be safer for us all to have officers who are proven to be mentally stable and able to handle any situation they were trained for with their experience rather than with any mental

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