Analysis Of Hidden Intellectualism In Blue Colored Brilliance

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What do you think about learning, whether it be going to college or not going to college? If you’re not, do you plan on working at a job for the rest of your life? According to Mike Ross in Blue Colored Brilliance Rose’s mother was only a waitress and didn’t go to college. He believes that she still acquired knowledge through brains and physically. Whereas Gerald Graff in Hidden Intellectualism believes that “street smarts” can turn into successful academic people. In Graff’s story he does a great way of listing the ideas to support how his mother still learned intellectual ideas by not going to college. Whereas Rose, tells stories about the ways that he thinks street smart people can be turned into successful people along with a little bit …show more content…
You’re solving problems, making things, building things, dealing with the public etc... whatever the case may be not everything you learn comes smoothly. Whether you are a waitress trying to remember your customer’s orders, or a student trying to remember your notes for your exam you’re still using intellectual skills in some way. Rose describes his mother to be a very effective and physical worker. She would not only “work smart or make every second count” (263) but “she did everything on the fly, and when a problem arose technical or human she solved them within the flow of work” (263). Some of us as humans on the other hand according to Graff over look people who are incredibly “street smart”, but are unable to apply those intellectual ideas to academics. Graff says that “although we assume that it’s possible to wax intellectual about Shakespeare, French Revolution, and nuclear fission, but not about cars dating, fashion, sports etcetera.” (237). Graff believes that if we would encourage and support them to be more apt to be intellectual about subjects that interest them. Rose believes that not only did his mom work in the kitchen, she still managed to learn something new every …show more content…
As far as Graff goes he was never one that liked to pick up a book and read it for fun. Unless he picked up a story or book about sports. Whether it was Sports magazines, Sports Illustrated, or novels on autobiographies on sport players. Graff refers himself to “I was your typical teenage anti-intellectual” (237). Rose his freshmen year studied the humanities, social and psychical sciences. He then later went back to graduate school to study education, and then became a member in a school of education. Rose believes that schools should look at more of what interest students have in certain subject’s, verses what teachers are telling them to learn about. Rose said “Sports after all was full of challenging arguments, debates, problems for analysis, and intricate statics that you could care about as school conspicuously was not” (239). Many people don’t realize, like history class having debates or arguments you can also do the same in talking about sports. Rose also thinks that schoolwork can isolate you from others, whereas when you enter sports debates it makes you feel like you have become a part of the community. Graff on the other hand, his mother worked in a restaurant and dealt with the community every day. She was also solving whatever problems were thrown at her

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