Blitzkrieg: The Invasion Of The Spanish Civil War

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“On Friday, September 1st of 1939, Germany invaded Poland after long-term political crises. German invasion began with an air raid on undefended city of Wielun at 4:40am” (Parada). After five weeks of fighting, the Germans were able to defeat the Polish armies by using their military tactic Blitzkrieg. Poland surrendered on October 6, 1939, after fighting the Germans for only a month. Blitzkrieg was a German tactic created by Colonel Guderian Heinz, who studied the mobile warfare tactics from one British officer who was General J.F.C. Fuller ("The Concept of Blitzkrieg"). Fuller was the one who studied the mobile warfare tactics first; but the British didn’t really care about these tactics. Only German leaders like Heinz studied these tactics …show more content…
Nazi Germany tested this tactic in the Spanish Civil War; they launch bombing raids on Spanish cities and killed a lot of Spanish citizens in these raids. But Germany saw that this new tactic worked in Spain ("The Concept of Blitzkrieg"). So they used the same tactic in their invasions of other nations. Poland was the first victim to fall to the German War Machine; the Polish armies weren’t ready, and they were devastated from the heavy bombing. After the invasion of Poland, Germany used Blitzkrieg in the invasion of France and Russia. In the early years of World War II, Blitzkrieg was bringing swift victories against Germany’s enemies in Europe. But while the war went on, Blitzkrieg started to fail Nazi Germany’s military in Russia because of the size of the Soviet Union and the supply lines for the …show more content…
“Germany was still at war with Britain, and Hitler believed that if the Soviet Union could be defeated quickly, the British would be more willing to accept peace terms” (Fleming). Hitler and Germany thought that invading the Soviet Union would cause the end of World War II in Europe. So the German military launched an invasion, splitting the Eastern forces into three separate army groups to attack the Soviet Union. “Hitler believed that the Blitzkrieg tactics employed against the other European countries could not be used as successfully against the Soviet Union. He conceded that due to its enormous size, the Soviet Union would take longer than other countries to occupy. However he was confident it could still be achieved during the summer months of 1941” (Simkin, “Operation Barbarossa”). The Blitzkrieg tactic helped the German armies break through the Soviet lines and push deeper into Soviet territory. But the Russian armies stopped the advancing Germans at Moscow, Stalingrad, and Leningrad, because there were too many Soviet soldiers in the cities for the German armies to fight. The German armies could not push forward anymore (Simkin, "Operation Barbarossa"). So Hitler’s plan was to make the Soviet Union surrender before the freezing winters of Russia came in, but that plan failed, and Germany had to fight in the cold Russian winters. “From early November the Germans were fighting in

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