Black Women During The American Revolution

Improved Essays
The Revolution had a tremendous impact on all of America, but when examined at a deeper perspective, it determined the way of life for women of the time. In her essay, Jacqueline Jones argues that gender and race shaped the lives of black women during the American Revolution. They were burdened in ways that differentiated from their male counterparts and whites. Whereas James Taylor Carson argues that Native American life allowed women to have more power and authority. Molly Brant, a Mohawk woman, did not settle for the traditional gender roles that she was expected to undertake, but she raised her power to a new height and made herself known as a Mohawk leader by taking advantage of Revolutionary opportunities. Jones and Carson reveal the contrasts in the lives of black women and Native American women during the Revolutionary. Although these women were living during this same time period, their experiences and ways of life were completely different. For black women, life was extremely difficult and burdensome. As resources were scarce, they were forced to survive with less food, clothing, and other necessities. Native American women did not face the same physical burdens as black women; Molly Brant had a powerful voice in the Mohawk diplomatic system because a women’s voice …show more content…
By understanding the conflicts whites were experiencing during the Revolution, we can see how the experiences of black women were shaped. Masters were so concerned about their own freedom during the revolution that they reacted in contradicting ways. Some masters freed their slaves because they were so passionate about their own freedom, however, out of anger, some masters fought even harder to enforce black subordination during this time. The inconsistency shown by masters made it difficult on black women, as many were overworked and physically

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