Hip Hop's Influence On African American Culture

Amazing Essays
There are millions and millions of songs in the world, these songs come after an event or a feeling that has an impact on the singer. These type of song creation was popular started during the slavery era. Hip-hop, originally created by African Americans has been around for many years. Not only do African Americans contribute to making Hip Hop music but other races as well. Hip Hop voices the issues that are currently happening to the African American community, such as death, racism, and police brutality. From Beyoncé singing about Black stereotypes to Macklemore, a white male, using his lyrics to stand with African Americans and crediting them. Hip Hop/Pop music has voiced the black oppressed community because they are a form of empowerment …show more content…
Society did not agree with the fact that, this black community of artists (singers), are causing no harm but just showing a expression through lyrics and images. People, mostly Caucasian, thought they were being attacked through her lyrics and especially with her Super Bowl outfit. Beyonce and her backup dancers were wearing outfits that looked very similar to the Black Panthers party, a controversial Civil Rights group that was against the government and all for self defence. Her music video for “Formation” also features her standing on top of a New Orleans cop car in the middle of the flood. This part of the video symbolizes Hurricane Katrina and how authorities did not aid the less fortunate during this situation. We also see how Fallon talks about how in the video there was a “graffiti wall with the words ‘stop shooting us’ . . . and a little boy dancing in front of the police riot squad” (Fallon). We see in the news of how protestors would put their hands up to show they are not going to do any harm, and how we have seen how people surrender themselves there is always a way they have been hurt. This is an action that many African American protestors have taken in order to show surrender. This part of the video is a strong image of black people as a whole. This shows a surrender, surrendering to all these deaths of their own race, they want to …show more content…
Macklemore empowers African Americans through his lyrics in ‘White Privilege II’ Gray says we can see how lyrics today can voice, African Americans issues they face in their daily lives. An article, written by Jacquelyn Gray, analyzes Macklemore’s lyrics in ‘White Privilege II’. Macklemore’s lyrics are providing his place in the situation the black community are facing, from innocent deaths, or discrimination against their race. Macklemore is showing that his empowerment through his words to African Americans, he knows the fact that society is listening to Hip Hop, trying to be apart of this community, but aren’t seeing the true meaning of the lyrics in the songs. This mean that every race besides African Americans that are consumers of Hip Hop music are not seeing the real issue, but pushing them aside and not standing with this very strong community.This leads to no one standing besides African Americans and not making the issue better but leading it to grow. In “White Privilege II,” “Macklemore weighs whether he should offer his voice to topics like racism or harassment or people who experience those things do the talking” (Gray). Macklemore is showing his perspective on the situation about how he views society and the black community, Macklemore is wondering if he should defend the white community since he is found to be

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    These lyrics are probably representing racial profiling as a Black person just wants to go to the movies but the White people downtown are saying to the Black person they 're not allowed to be at the Movie theater. In the song Sam Cooke also speaks on how Black people do not support each other in a time of need and just attack each other. A piece of lyrics that represent this is "Then I go to my brother And I say brother help me please But he winds up knockin ' me back down on my knees". This song became the anthem for the Civil Rights Movement and was covered by other artist like Aretha…

    • 967 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    However, black stands for what they believed in they started creating music. From the 1930’s to the 1950’s black culture became a source of strength for African Americans. A lot of black artists confront discrimination through their art, music and literature, but surrounded by white man it created tensions. Many Black Americans insisted that music, visual and performing arts serve both a political function and an aesthetic purpose. Black American artists had to confront racism in the culture industry because black music reflects the community’s values, tensions, and anxieties.…

    • 782 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Hip-Hop And Youth Culture

    • 714 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The young generation has been influenced by the Hip-Hop culture in many ways. The word “Ni88a” has been transformed and recognize as being a common word for the African American community. But in reality “Ni88a” is a word that started the idea of “post-segregation” before it was legalized. American is built on a lot of faults that lead to the construct of the Hip-Hop subculture. If blacks were treated like everyone else in society, Hip-Hop will not exist.…

    • 714 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Rap music was popular among African- American people, it’s been a type of news to inform the population of how black were been treated. Rap groups like N.W.A.…

    • 1266 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The influence of hip hop on the African American community is very much so prevalent that many wonder why, but after examining socially conscious hip hop and the influences it has on the African American culture you may have a better understanding as of why the importance is so strong and why Chuck D of Public Enemy stated rap to be the “black CNN“. First I want to look at hip hop and how hip hop was started and the messages pertaining to police brutality, cultural, political, and depictions of economic struggles that’s delivered through music and touches the soul. Hip hop first started in New York around 1970, just south of the Bronx when drugs, poverty and violence was hitting hard. A DJ by the name of Kool Herc began mixing records starting…

    • 784 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This was “the first generation of African American that were able to grow up without experiencing legalized segregation” (Kitwana 115). This time period of rap artists described the social issues that were present in black urban life. This later fostered more genres of Hip Hop music such as hardcore rap, gangster rap and many more. Although the Hip Hop artist during this time experienced fewer forms of racism and legalized segregation was outlawed, they still felt the growing pressures of being a minority in white America. This idea continues to encourage many artists to express their struggles musically.…

    • 1461 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The phrase “my melanin brothers and sister” establishes Bradley 's target audience, the African American community. He chose this audience because they already relate to and understand the implications of his argument. The first person use of “us” and “our” makes the audience feel that Bradley is standing with them in the fight for social justice. These phrases are biased because they solely appeal to an African American audience. He writes, “the acknowledgment that our struggle is not unheard or ignored.” This quote is a use of kairos due to the recent rise of racial injustice faced by the African American community.…

    • 878 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    However, Lamar also describes the consequences that come with success and wealth, as he is open about his depression and suicidal thoughts. Through Lamar’s message, it seems as he is explaining that life itself – both in poverty and success – is a struggle, and the intertwining of racial tension adds to that struggle. Lamar does not say to give up, though, but instead raps the hook, “We gon’ be alright…” By continuously repeating this, Lamar is reminding his Black audience that despite the pain and suffering they will go through, they will survive as long as they are united and proud of their culture. A significant symbol repeated in the video is police brutality, as Lamar shows scenes of him in a cop car as cops carry him and the ending, when Lamar is shot by a policeman by a “finger-gun”. Lamar is standing in solidarity with the “#blacklivesmatter”…

    • 1364 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    For instance, his hits “Don’t Be a Dropout” and “Say it Loud, I’m Black and I’m Proud” gave anthems of pride and educational importance which immensely influenced black culture. This was different than many militant and nonviolent political groups which were addressing black power, but also dividing their own community because they themselves couldn’t see eye to eye. Moreover, James Brown continuously demonstrated how his music and peaceful approach to uniting the black community was extremely effective. For example, the night Martin Luther King Jr was assassinated James Brown prevented Boston from burning down like the other cities. This not only proved his ability to use his music to bring African Americans joy, pride, and unity; but also ease his communities’…

    • 737 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Flyboy 2 Themes

    • 1531 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Greg Tate’s Flyboy 2 is a collection of African American works about music, culture, and more designed to illustrate important themes within the Black society. The main themes that Tate examines throughout his work involves the discussion of race, identity, and gender in a minority race within American society. The writings composed in the novel entail historic accounts, such as Michael Jackson’s struggle in society to Ice Cube’s perspective on rap and its influence in African American culture. Sade explores the criticism and misunderstandings that the media displays while ensuring that one must stay true to their purpose within the music industry. Tate also discusses the injustices that the hip hop industry had to face in relation to whites attempting to profit off of an institution that was intended to assist in black freedom.…

    • 1531 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays