Black Slavery Thesis

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Black slavery is among the most controversial issues that have caused various debates among historians in the American society. It is quite critical to note that the history of black slavery commences from 1776 during the American independence to about 1865, the period when the Civil War ended (Leslie 150). During this period, the American government legalized the civil war in their constitution, which allowed the white American to own the black slaves and use them at their own pleasure. As such, more people entered US, more so from the African continent, with West Africa serving as the most affected region (Larry 12). Such individuals worked in the American firms, while others resided in towns and took part in the construction of the cities …show more content…
During this period, the British settlers in North America dominated vast tobacco firms. However, their poor status could not enable them to pay for the labor wages, the factor that triggered them to resort to Africans for the purposes of acquiring cheap labor. In 1620, about 20 African immigrants arrived at Jamestown, Virginia, and bean to work in European firms. Since then, the slavery spread all over the American colonies. !8th century was the climax of the migration of the Black Africans to Americans, with the figure estimated by the Historians to be around 9 million slaves (Wilma 24). The migration incidence was indeed a blow to African continent since their elegant people had disappeared foreign nations to take part in slavery as well as serve the white people. In most cases, the slaves worked in large plantations that reared crops such as tobacco, rice and other cash crops that mostly benefited the whites. The slaves did not secure any pay at all, but received some food and shelter as their pay. It is also vial to note that most of the slaves lived in the Southern American and worked in the firms of the …show more content…
Such families faced humiliation, pain and psychological torture since the American constitution did not consider them as legal. In most cases, such families lived apart, since one or two of their members could easily join other groups of slaves at a further distance (Wilma 220). The America colonial considered them as properties hence denied them the right to enter into a pact or contract. The first lot of the American slaves to marry occurred in 1865, when the nation legalized them to marry by ending their slavery (Sterling

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