Life After Death Analysis

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Modern Christianity pushes the belief that when you die you either go to heaven or hell. Bishop N. Tom Wright corrects this theory though several passages in the Bible. We see that there indeed is a different plan than just that we live, we die, and then we go to heaven. Bishop Wright shows us what he calls “Life after life after death.” After watching Wright’s video, I do disagree with one thing. I feel by his definition of life after death. It should be Life after death after life. What does happen when we die? How does death link to God 's big plan for the world as we know it? In Tom Wrights lecture at King 's College, he address ' the topic of Death, Resurrection, and Afterlife. This entire discussion can be expressed in what Wright likes to call “life after life after death.” What he means by this phrase is, you live, you die (or as the Bible would call it, sleep), and God resurrects you. We find several passages in the Bible on the subject. Daniel 12:2-3 reads “2 Multitudes who sleep in the dust of the earth will awake: some to everlasting life, others to shame and everlasting contempt. 3 Those who are wise will shine like the brightness of …show more content…
N.T. Wright words it this way, “The conservative Sadducee rejecting it, the more radical Pharisee embracing it, and other Jewish groups and individuals remaining ambiguous or in some cases opting for some form of Platonism.” This controversy of life after death was the highlight of the first century. It was believed that the resurrection is a point where Gods creation and Gods justice meet. With this said, it determines that what we do does matter on earth. This controversy of resurrection was the main reason most Jews did not see eye to eye. Even after Jesus Christ’s resurrection, the first century Christians did not focus on life after death with their lives. They were spreading the news of Jesus ' resurrection and sharing the

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