Birmingham Jail Analysis

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1. King addresses the fellow Clergyman who labeled his activities in Birmingham as “’unwise and untimely’” (¶ 1)
2. Omit
3. He is in Birmingham because he 1) was invited; 2) because he has “organizational ties”; 3) more importantly, because “ injustice is here”(¶¶2-3)
4. King compares his situation in Birmingham to old testaments prophets who left his village to spread the word of God. Similarly, like Apostle Paul who left Tarsus to spread “the gospel of Jesus Christ,” King asserts that he too has the missions to spread his” gospel of freedom” beyond the boundary of his home. (¶3)

5. King rebuked his audience by telling them that their statement “fails so express a similar concern for the conditions that brought about the demonstrations.”
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King states that the word “wait” is wrong because the word “has almost always meant “Never”.” Thus the “wait” is wrong because, action had be taken. (¶13)

14. King suggests that the people break unjust laws with civil disobedience and gives several examples like the Boston Tea Party or, “Christians, who were willing to face hungry loins and the excruciating pain of chopping blocks rather than summit to certain unjust laws of the Roman Empire.” (¶20)

15. King suggests that the people break unjust laws with civil disobedience and gives several examples like the Boston Tea Party or, “Christians, who were willing to face hungry loins and the excruciating pain of chopping blocks rather than summit to certain unjust laws of the Roman Empire.” (¶20)

16. King compared the terms “legal” and “illegal” using the world wars, reminding us “that everything Adolf Hitler did in Germany was "legal" and everything the Hungarian freedom fighters did in Hungary was ‘illegal.’” King pointed this out to say that just because, it is “legal” does not mean it is right and just because, something is “illegal” does not mean it is wrong.
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To King the real heroes were the “sit-inners and demonstrators of Birmingham for their sublime courage, willingness to suffer, and their amazing discipline in the mist of great provocation.” The real heroes were: people like James Merediths who faced “jeering and hostile mobs”; the “old, oppressed, battered Negro women, symbolized in a seventy two year old woman in Montgomery, Alabama, who rose up with a sense of dignity and with her people decided not to ride segregated buses” or, the “the young high school and college students, the young ministers of the gospel and a host of their elders, courageously and nonviolently sitting in at lunch counters and willingly going to jail for conscience ' sake.”

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