External Locus Of Control

1498 Words 6 Pages
Society and the health care community’s perception of health has greatly evolved over the past few centuries. The 19th century was regarded as a century of linear ideologies, especially in the biomedical field (Ogden, 2012). Illness was seen as the result of an invasion that causes physical damage to the body. Humans were the victims of illness and not the culprit; illness was out of the individual’s control (Ogden, 2012). Medical intervention governed by medical professionals was the only appropriate way to overcome illness (Ogden, 2012 and Nettleton, 2006). The body and mind were thought to be separate entities; the mind was strictly responsible for thoughts and emotions and the body was seen as physical matter (Ogden, 2012 and Burton …show more content…
Thus, providing health education, health promotion, and discouraging a patient’s unhealthy behaviour is paramount (Odgen, 2012). Various factors will impede the patient’s willingness for change. Different theories have been developed that predict a patient’s response to change (Odgen, 2012). One of these theories is locus of control; one can have an internal locus of control or an external locus of control regarding particular behaviour. The relationship between diet and exercise is a good example to understand locus of control. Those with an internal locus of control will view their actions eating and exercise habits as the contributors to their weight and overall health. While those with an external locus of control believe that their health and weight is the result of bad genetics, fate and luck, independent from eating and exercise behaviours (Cobb-Clark, Kassenboehmer, & Schurer, 2014). Health professionals can greatly influence patient’s medical intervention by identifying the patient’s locus of control. Promoting good health behaviours, support and reducing risks illness, to people characterized of having an external locus can have a positive outcome on their health (Buhagiar, 2011). Unrealistic optimism is a theory that explains one’s perception of their susceptibility to illness compared to others. Weinstein describes …show more content…
In health psychology, high compliance is associated with high concordance. For a patient to adopt high concordance, a partnership between them and their clinician must be established, which will allow the patient to make informed decisions. Studies have shown that patients are, generally, very noncompliant with their medial interventions and remedies. This is especially true in people with chronic conditions like diabetes, hypertension, and pulmonary diseases (Odgen, 2013 and Dekker, Dieleman, Kaptein, & Mulder, 1993). Numerous factors may influence a patient’s compliance with their medical advice, such as a patient’s, socioeconomic status and personality traits. A study conducted the USA on compliance in orthodontic care found that certain personality traits are predictive of the patients’ level of compliance (Mehra, Namda & Sinha, 1998). Subjects that were obedient, accommodating, and had high self-confidence and self-esteem tended to be more compliant, while those who were agitated, nervous and introverted were less compliant (Mehra, Namda & Sinha,

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