The Three Main Stages Of Alcoholic

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Alcoholism Most people can stop drinking after one or two alcoholic beverages, but some people however, cannot stop and are at great risk of alcoholism. Alcohol does not just effect a person physically, but also affects them mentally. Excessive drinking over an extended period of time can make the human body dependent on alcohol, and start to make the brain unstable. After a person continues to drink over an extended period of time, he or she requires alcohol just to feel normal and go about the day. “Since 1956 alcoholism has been considered a primary disease by the American medical association” (LakesideMilam). Although there’s multiple reasons in becoming an alcoholic, there are three main phases of alcoholism. The early stage towards …show more content…
During the middle stage, John will start to notice the social and physical effects of drinking. As he keeps drinking throughout an extended period of time, his cells will start to adapt to being constantly under the influence. Once the cells become adapt to alcohol, his body will require it just to perform daily functions. When John is sober, his cells will be in distress, which in return will create withdrawal symptoms. Now that the cells are physically dependent on alcohol, John starts to crave the need for it. With these “cravings” happening throughout the day, he will gradually start to lose psychological control over his ability to restrain himself from drinking. John loses control over his using because of tolerance decreases and withdrawal symptom increases. After his body is physically dependent and he is having constant cravings is when John starts to lose control of his body, and is no longer able to restrict himself from drinking at appropriate …show more content…
After a long enough period of heavy chronic alcohol use, withdrawal symptoms may be so painful that John is motivated to continually drink just to prevent them. John is no longer the same person physically or emotionally that he used to be before he started drinking. Now that John’s body and mental state requires alcohol to function, he then starts drinking whenever he has a chance. At this point he has become so set on drinking that it has interfered with or destroyed relationships with friends or family. Even though John is still able to have a job at this phase, his work ethic will eventually start to suffer. As a he continues to move up through the stages it becomes more and more difficult to quit. If John is at stage three and doesn’t realize his problem and get help, then he could end up having severe health problems, or possibly even death. “Because of the astounding 80,000 deaths that are related to alcohol abuse every year, alcohol abuse is the third highest cause of death in the U.S.”

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