Binge Drinking: The Three Main Stages Of Alcoholism

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Alcoholism Most people can stop drinking after one or two alcoholic beverages, but some people however, cannot stop and are at great risk of alcoholism. Alcohol does not just effect a person physically, but also affects them mentally. Excessive drinking over an extended period of time can make the human body dependent on alcohol, and start to make the brain unstable. After a person continues to drink over an extended period of time, he or she requires alcohol just to feel normal and go about the day. “Since 1956 alcoholism has been considered a primary disease by the American medical association” (LakesideMilam). Although there’s multiple reasons in becoming an alcoholic, there are three main phases of alcoholism. The early stage towards …show more content…
People in the experimental stage are drinkers who may be new to various types of alcohol and are likely to test out their limits. “An estimated 367,000 girls and 311,000 boys ages 12 to 17 had alcohol use disorder (AUD) in the United States” (Joseph). Kids that start drinking in their teens are more likely to go out to parties and other gatherings to binge drink. Most people that first start drinking only drink every so often but, when they do, it is in mass amounts. Drinking large amounts of alcohol in a short period of time is what’s known as “binge drinking”. Binge drinking for example would be if John was to drink five or more alcoholic beverages within two hours. John thinks that binge drinking is a safer alternative when he only does it every so often, but mass amounts of alcohol consumption in a short period of time can create many different types of health …show more content…
During the middle stage, John will start to notice the social and physical effects of drinking. As he keeps drinking throughout an extended period of time, his cells will start to adapt to being constantly under the influence. Once the cells become adapt to alcohol, his body will require it just to perform daily functions. When John is sober, his cells will be in distress, which in return will create withdrawal symptoms. Now that the cells are physically dependent on alcohol, John starts to crave the need for it. With these “cravings” happening throughout the day, he will gradually start to lose psychological control over his ability to restrain himself from drinking. John loses control over his using because of tolerance decreases and withdrawal symptom increases. After his body is physically dependent and he is having constant cravings is when John starts to lose control of his body, and is no longer able to restrict himself from drinking at appropriate

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