Maxophone History

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The saxophone is still considered, and in many ways, will always be the youngest wind instrument to have a foothold in western classical music. Having been developed and patented by instrument creator and businessman Adolphe Sax in 1846, the saxophone had already missed out on much of the literature and masterworks written for other wind instruments centuries before its time. Additionally, much of the major classical musical works written for the instrument happened during its constant refinement development in Europe; allowing the saxophone to have more of a foothold in the originally American music idiom of jazz. However, the saxophone has carved out its place in the aspects of the writing of new music, specifically in the aspects of the …show more content…
The start of the genre can be traced back to the works and projects of many early radio stations, universities, and independent musician groups that spear headed the composition of taped music. In 1958, Fransco Kröpfl, founder of the Estudio de Fonologia Musical at the University of Buenos Aires, started manipulating the tape speeds of music and samples on magnetic audio tape within a tape recoder, developed a photocell-based envelope controller, and built a reverberation chamber that served as a filter. With the assistance of technician Fausto Maranca and fellow visiting composer Pierre Boulez, Kröpfl could compose Ejercicio de Impulsos, Dialolgos I, and Dialogos II (1960). Soon after, Kröpfl would go on to become the musical director of the Centro Latinoamericano de Altos Estudio Musicales/ Latin American Center for Advanced Musical Studies (CLAEM); in which would be reorganized into the Centro de Investigaziones en Communication Massiva, Artes, y Technologia (CICMAT) where much more music of this type would be …show more content…
Works by Sain, Mobberly, J.J. Johnson, and Lewis also included inflections of jazz or popular music within their pieces for live performance. Yet, there are composers like Jacob Ter Veldhuis (1951) that seem to be in a league of their own. Ter Veldhuis, also known as Jacob TV, is a Dutch avant-garde composer whose background in composition and electronic music training from the Groningen Conservatory and as a rock and roll musician had a base in much of the thirty years of compositions with traditional and electronic mediums. After winning the Composition Prize of the Netherlands, Ter Veldhuis would go on to become a full time composer and champion his genre of “boom-box aka ghetto-blaster” music; musical works with live instruments with soundtracks based on speech and heavy syncopation. While having a classically trained background, Ter Veldhuis is considered an outlaw in the classical music world having much of his works of pop music inflections performed in classical recitals and concerts. Research by musicologist Paul Janssen led him to support Ter Veldhuis the “Andy Warhol of music” as much of his music is a reflection of pop-art culture (as much of his music take from television shows, hip-hop, and street culture) and the composer’s disdain for the separation of high-brow and low-brow musical

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