Bilbo Hero's Journey Analysis

999 Words 4 Pages
All narratives refer to the art of storytelling, a sequence that is followed known as the Hero’s Journey. An example of a narrative that exhibits the Hero’s Journey is The Hobbit, a fictional novel written by J.R.R Tolkien about a Hobbit, Bilbo Baggins, who goes on an enticing adventure. This essay will elucidate why tests, allies, and enemies, the sixth stage of the Hero’s Journey, more specifically the tests, is the most significant stage of the narrative, as the trials mold Bilbo into a daring hero; these challenges brought about Bilbo’s profound heroic progression. Scenarios within the novel that indicate a development of gallant attributes in Bilbo’s demeanor, are Bilbo attempting to bridge peace between the dwarves, Lakemen, and Elves, …show more content…
Nevertheless, when Bilbo first met Gandalf, his principles were quite unheroic. His first response to a journey was, “we don’t want any adventures here, thank you!” (Tolkien,7). However, Bilbo’s morals undergo quite an improvement. The development of strong, heroic morals becomes evident in Bilbo when the Lakemen, Elves, and dwarves argue over Smaug’s treasure. Bilbo ends up presenting “the Heart of the Mountain; and it is also the heart of Thorin.” (Tolkien, 314) to the Lakemen and Elves, despite that Thorin desired it above all else. Bilbo decides he will give it to them, “if it will aid in your bargaining” (Tolkien, 314). He then says, “the dwarves can do what they like to me. I hope you will find it useful” (Tolkien, 314). This trial places Bilbo in a dilemma, due to his value of peace; he could not stand to see unnecessary conflicts arise. Bilbo disregarded his own fate and placed the needs of others above his, as the friendship he had with the dwarves, would be tarnished. Undergoing this test brought to light and developed the strong set of principles Bilbo now has. Conversely, a hero without any principles has nothing to fight for, consequently, nothing to offer. The attribute of devotion towards morals that Bilbo has gained paints him a …show more content…
Likewise, the progression of a hero is apparent when their intellectuality is tried. Cleverly, Bilbo manages to devise and execute an elaborate plan to free the dwarves from the Elvenking’s prisons. Opportunistically noticing that the Chief-guard has gotten drunk, he steals the keys to the cells. The freed dwarves immediately turn to Bilbo for direction, however, after explaining his plan, they evidently “did not like it a bit, and started grumbling loudly in spite of their danger” (Tolkien, 208). Nonetheless, Bilbo demonstrates leadership, as he calms the dwarves and they begin “following the Hobbit down into the lowest cellars” (Tolkien, 209). Bilbo’s plan was placing each dwarf into a barrel, to float on a river flowing out of the tunnels. Once finished with packing the dwarves, Bilbo was “left alone again, running around putting the finishing touches to the packaging, and hoping against hope that his plan would come off” (Tolkien, 210). This trial placed a sense of urgency and pressure upon Bilbo, to remain calm, leading an escape. Seeing him accomplish this, displays his advance as a heroic character. Ordinarily the Baggins side of Bilbo “never had any adventures or did anything unexpected” (Tolkien, 4); however, the Tookish side, the adventurous side in Bilbo, has now emerged. This outburst of intelligence and leadership was brought out in Bilbo and displayed

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