Big Fish Character Analysis

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Today, young adults and adults themselves cannot fully explain the difference between imagination and reality. We think of imagination as a world filled with dinosaurs or breathing underwater, however these are the things are able to be performed in the outside world. There was a time when we could walk with dinosaurs and tanks to breathe underwater. For those who have seen the movie Big Fish can see the exaggeration between reality and imagination. Main character, Edward Bloom, tells many incredible life lesson stories that his son, William, cannot seem to believe. He eventually realizes that using a little imagination in stories doesn’t hurt when teaching lifelong lessons. In the movie Big Fish, William learns the actual truth behind his father’s stories and how the exaggerated version was more of an eye opener than the reality check. A story can never be considered a story if some parts seem impossible to happen. Books, for example, the Hunger Games is violent and breathtaking though it influences readers to stay true to who they are regardless of what obstacles come in the way. This would be considered the overall point of storytelling. Authors put the reader in certain situations, regardless of how unbelievable they may seem, so they can experience the expedition it took to learn the overall theme. When William discovers …show more content…
It’s the unique characteristic humans have to release their creativity in the real world. Also, it allows many to express ideas and even life lessons in a variety of ways. From the movie, Big Fish, Edward uses this creativity in his stories in order to teach his son William the lifelong lessons he had learned in his past. As any other child, William grows up and believes his father has lied to him the whole time. He claims that he only sees 10% of the iceberg. However, as Miller explains, the truth is normally hidden. There is not a solid Truth is any story whether it’s a fairy tale or

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