Biff And The American Dream Analysis

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Willy and Biff’s beliefs are quite antagonistic. The former believes in the “American Dream” while the other wants to fulfill his life in other ways. Willy is fixated on his belief that he and his sons are great men deserving of success, fame, and fortune. Willy refuses to accept that reality is otherwise and this causes him and Biff to clash constantly. At the beginning of the play, Biff’s beliefs seemed to be confused. When he confides to Happy in the bedroom, he admitted he was lost and a failure. Apparently, Biff had nagging insecurities and he thought he had to fulfill the American Dream too. When the deal failed, Biff had a significant realization. At this moment, he saw himself as he truly is and learned to accept the truth. In a sense, …show more content…
Throughout the play, Biff also had significant character development. Correspondingly, he is the only member of the Lomman family who dared to speak the truth and accept this truth. Willy’s belief kept him in a constant state of desire and turmoil while Biff learned to accept and be content with the way things are. In contrast, Willy’s beliefs in the “American dream” are the one the author condemns. The audience can see the negative impact his beliefs had on himself and his family. Ultimately, Willy’s tragic life and death could’ve been completely different if he had different beliefs. At his father’s funeral, Biff said, “he had the wrong dreams [,] all, all, wrong.” In my opinion, he was speaking of the “American Dream” between the lines and he is sending that message to the audience. Personally, I support Biff’s and ultimately the author’s beliefs. I strongly agree that the “American Dream” cannot lead everyone to fulfillment and happiness. At the end of the story, Biff learns who he truly is and accepts it fully; I believe this is the first step towards being content with oneself. When we finally know ourselves we can see what we need and what makes us truly …show more content…
On one hand, Willy sees himself as a man destined to be successful and great. He talks like he is a “big shot” and act like his son is meant to be one too. On the other hand, we can see his insecurity and weak sense of self. In my opinion, the former self is a mask to cover the second, which is the truth he is trying to hide. His son, at the beginning of the story, saw himself as a failure. With this in mind, he came back to his parent’s house in New York and tried to please society and his family by becoming a business man. At the end of the story, he realizes who he is, a man who likes physical work and the great outdoors. Let’s not forget that he sees himself and his father as “common mans” and this did not seem to bother him at all, on the opposite of Willy. I believe Miller showed us two characters who were quite lost in the beginning but in two different ways. As we can see, one finds his path and the other does not. I also believe the author sees his two characters as common mans, after all, this is what he wanted to represent. We can especially see this when Biff tells his father, “we are a dime a dozen”. The fact that they are common, middle-class workers is an important point of the story. I personally see Willy as a misguided man who puts important were it shouldn’t be. Despite that, I do sympathize with him, especially because we are seeing the play from his

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