Beyond Storm And Stress Article Analysis

806 Words 4 Pages
In the article, Beyond Storm and Stress: Typicality, transactions, timing, and temperament to account for adolescent change, Hollenstein and Lougheed describe the hypothesis of “Storm and Stress” by breaking it apart and revising each key point with the recent 4T hypothesis. Throughout the article, Hollenstein and Lougheed discuss adolescent change in the subcategories that lie within the primary focuses of the commentary. They thoroughly discuss the evolution of an adolescent’s behavior, which is broken down into three primary categories; biological changes, then environment they’re exposed to, and emotional-regulation skills. “The decrease in self-control (storm), and the corresponding increase in sensitivity to surrounding stimuli (stress)” …show more content…
This new hypothesis is far more universal and is applicable to many people because it factors in many widespread variables understanding that not everyone goes through life in the same manner. While the “Storm and Stress” hypothesis coincides with the 4T hypothesis, the “Storm and Stress” hypothesis focuses on very specific and well researched factors that only apply to a select few, while the 4T hypothesis improves upon the “Storm and Stress” hypothesis and applies to a broader range of …show more content…
This turns them into their own characteristic individual. “Whether perfecting a Chopin nocturne or watching 10 hours of TV per day, the adolescent is crystallizing into the adult they are to become through experiences that sculpt their brains” (Hollenstein & Lougheed 449). Growing up in certain environments adolescents naturally adapt by gaining certain skills and forgetting others in order to thrive in a given situation. Through their varying experiences and environments adolescents will develop their own set of emotions, “depression, anxiety, aggression, risk taking, sexual behavior, suicide, interpersonal conflict, self-injury and passionate interests in the art, athletics, and peer relations all stem from emotional processes” (Hollenstein & Lougheed 449). Through varying experiences in life they will have different coping mechanisms, and responses to certain stimulus. An example of this would be if an individual experiences rejection in their environment, they could either respond aggressively or act in a more reclusive manner, focusing time and energy with those that already accept

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