Jean-Francois Lyotard's Postmodernity

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The most popular writer with regards in postmodernity, is Jean-Francois Lyotard, he primarily define the term postmodernity as a contemporary condition that we live and champions the forms of resistance and critics. Lyotard believed that, in a postmodernity period, there is a question regarding the sense of the ownership. Who controls the flow of an idea from one person to another and who has access to their ideas. With that, the person became a consumer of knowledge that can transform into a commodity. His idea regarding the ownership of knowledge or idea that became a substantial change from the ways of knowledge that was regarded from the past or earlier generations and the modernity period. Hannah Arendt’s themes are: the theory of political …show more content…
The postmodernity thinkers assert that modernity leads to social practices and institutions that became a legitimize dominance and control by the few, rather than the majority, although the modern thinkers promised to have an equality, free and liberation of an individual and all the people. Nonetheless, notwithstanding the frameworks and themes that have mentioned, each individual does not merely sustain the claim that there is a complete break between modernity and postmodernity. Of course things have changed: new manners, new approaches, and new styles. Some might think that there is a complete break between modernity and postmodernity; with the fact that Enlightenment occurred, which is everything has an end. Whereas the period of Enlightenment is where science and logic prevail, this means that there is a break between the present and past. Although it still cannot be argued that there is a separation between these concepts because of having relations to each other. To be modern is to break with the past, for having new themes and concepts. However, it cannot prosper since there is always a continuation in every period. And every frameworks and themes of an individual thinker …show more content…
Postmodernity is not to be considered as a new stage, rather, it is merely a collection of critiques and arguments that seek to challenge the premises that has shaped the modern experience. Since it does not have a complete break between modernity and postmodernity, why should we even bother the term “postmodern” at all if we are in part of a modern world, which we can see that modernity is more capable of carrying out its own critique and arguments. Postmodernity is just a reconstruction of the traditional ideas from the modernity. This means that postmodernity is the intimation of a transcendence of all the modern formations of universality. The simultaneous existence of the pre-historical, historical and post-historical conditions means that the old universality of the modern concepts that have been challenged by the postmodern. To conclude this, Postmodernity is misplaced; it is just only a reflection to the unresolved inconsistencies of

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