Why Did Stalin Develop The Marshal Plan

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In 1945 directly following the end of WWII, Nazi territory was separated into zones. Each Allie country (US, France and Great Britain) were given a zone during the Potsdam Conference. During this conference the Soviet Union’s assigned zone encompassed all of Germany, along with other European countries. This concerned the Allies as it was apparent the priority of the USSR was to spread communism and their idealistic views. Therefore the Allies divided the city of Berlin into East and West sectors, so that the Allies could control half the city to insure it did not fall to communism. The USSR isolated West Berlin, the Soviet half of the city, from the rest of the world. For the course of approximately one year no cars, plans, trains or citizens …show more content…
The USSR feared that the United States, and all other capitalist countries, were threatening the spread of communism through actions such as the Marshal Plan. In 1947 President Truman created the Marshal Plan to aspire in the rebuilding of Europe. The plan offered economic aid ($13 billion) to all countries rebuilding after the war . Stalin viewed this as American Imperialism and declined any aid for Western European countries under Soviet control . The Marshal Plan threatened Stalin as many of the European countries who were destroyed as a result of WWII were accepting the United States’ capitalist money. This would create a strong allegiance between the United States and poor European countries, this allows capitalism to appear to be the superior system to the poor countries. Communism now had little chance of spreading to any countries which accepted aid from the Marshal Plan. The USSR introduced the Molotov Plan, which offered aid to countries economically and physically destroyed after the war, in order to combat the Marshal Plan. The Molotov Plan also forbid any Eastern European countries under Soviet control from taking any finical aid from the Marshal Plan . The USSR controlled portion of Berlin was poorly politically and economically managed which led the Berliners to favour the

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