The Importance Of Benjamin Franklin's Contribution To The American Revolution

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The life of Benjamin Franklin, an American mastermind, is purely breathtaking. His ability to accomplish so much within his life is proof of the American Dream. Not only did Franklin have a scientific life, but he also has a political life. Although first a strong supporter of the English crown and Parliament, Franklin later becomes a powerful and important contributor to the American Revolution. This paper will argue that Franklin’s reason for his shift is simply because of Great Britain’s unwilling efforts to compromise with the colonies.
Franklin begins his political life in 1751 as a representative to the Pennsylvania General Assembly. During his time as a representative, Franklin works to give Pennsylvania concrete streets and oil-burning street lights. Like many other American colonists, Franklin did not expect the American Revolution in 1776. Franklin’s loyalty to Britain is natural patriotism, for Great Britain is his mother country; the country of arts and influential thinkers. As the population of the colonies grows over the century, Franklin dreams of a future where the thirteen colonies and the British Empire mutually benefit each other; prosperity within a relationship between the parent and the children. He expresses his devoted patriotism towards Britain by devising a Plan of Union in 1751 (Chapter X / Page 123.) In
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His change of heart in patriotism due to his realization that England would not compromise with her colonies, significantly advances America ahead of other nations. Not only did Franklin have a political life, but also a life full of science, civil services, and innovations. He shows his leadership capacity through the Seven Years’ War, Revolutionary War, and the creation of a new nation. This man greatly changes the course of history during the 1700s and it is almost impossible to live in this modern era of American society without his

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